Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJenkins, Jennifer L.
dc.contributor.authorQuiroga, Guillermo
dc.contributor.authorQuiballo, Kari
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Herman A.
dc.contributor.authorSorrell, Rhiannon
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-10T17:09:45Z
dc.date.available2021-06-10T17:09:45Z
dc.date.issued2017-01-01
dc.identifier.issn00652830
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/S0065-283020170000043009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/656459
dc.descriptionEl texto completo de este trabajo no está disponible en el Repositorio Académico UPC por restricciones de la casa editorial donde ha sido publicado.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis chapter discusses some of the challenges faced by tribal libraries. Considering the information provided throughout the rest of this volume, it is clear that some of the core issues-such as poor broadband availability, difficulties in achieving economies of scale, and barriers to collaboration-are shared between tribal institutions and rural libraries throughout the United States. The chapter presents a brief review of the literature on tribal libraries, establishing how they compare with rural public libraries in the United States. The remainder of the chapter is designed as a conversation piece, with responses from interviews with librarians from two tribal libraries detailing how the challenges faced by these outlets parallel those faced by America's rural libraries. • Tribal libraries face obstacles that are common among nontribal rural public libraries, such as poor broadband Internet availability, lack of funding, and geographic barriers that limit patron access. • Although public libraries exist in some tribal communities, other forms of libraries and cultural heritage institutions often fill the service roles that public libraries occupy in nontribal communities. • Public-oriented information institutions in tribal communities commonly preserve and promote tribal heritage, often as one of their primary purposes. Considering that this is often achieved on limited budgets, further documentation of these efforts could be useful for guiding nontribal rural public libraries that wish to do more to preserve and promote their local cultural heritage. This study creates bridges between rural public libraries in the United States and tribal libraries, which are commonly studied as two separate phenomena. Although the authors document how these types of institutions differ from each other in significant ways, barriers of broadband access, geographic isolation, and lack of funding are common across both rural and tribal libraries. The information provided in this chapter shows that both types of institutions need solutions for similar problems.en_US
dc.formatapplication/htmlen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Ltd.en_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/embargoedAccessen_US
dc.subjectNative cultural heritageen_US
dc.subjectRural librariesen_US
dc.subjectTribal librariesen_US
dc.titleRural and small libraries: The tribal experienceen_US
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleen_US
dc.identifier.journalAdvances in Librarianshipen_US
dc.identifier.eid2-s2.0-85041633233
dc.identifier.scopusidSCOPUS_ID:85041633233
dc.source.journaltitleAdvances in Librarianship
dc.source.volume43
dc.source.beginpage203
dc.source.endpage218
dc.identifier.isni0000 0001 2196 144X


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record