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dc.contributor.authorSánchez-Siancas, Luis E.*
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez-Medina, Angélica*
dc.contributor.authorPiscoya, Alejandro*
dc.contributor.authorBernabe-Ortiz, Antonio*
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-02T15:33:04Z
dc.date.available2018-05-02T15:33:04Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-12
dc.identifier.citationAssociation between perceived social support and induced abortion: A study in maternal health centers in Lima, Peru 2018, 13 (4):e0192764 PLOS ONEes
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0192764
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/623478
dc.description.abstractObjectives This study aimed to assess the association between perceived social support and induced abortion among young women in Lima, Peru. In addition, prevalence and incidence of induced abortion was estimated. Methods/Principal findings A cross-sectional study enrolling women aged 18–25 years from maternal health centers in Southern Lima, Peru, was conducted. Induced abortion was defined as the difference between the total number of pregnancies ended in abortion and the number of spontaneous abortions; whereas perceived social support was assessed using the DUKE-UNC scale. Prevalence and incidence of induced abortion (per 100 person-years risk) was estimated, and the association of interest was evaluated using Poisson regression models with robust variance. A total of 298 women were enrolled, mean age 21.7 (± 2.2) years. Low levels of social support were found in 43.6% (95%CI 38.0%–49.3%), and 17.4% (95%CI: 13.1%–21.8%) women reported at least one induced abortion. The incidence of induced abortion was 2.37 (95%CI: 1.81–3.11) per 100 person-years risk. The multivariable model showed evidence of the association between low perceived social support and induced abortion (RR = 1.94; 95%CI: 1.14–3.30) after controlling for confounders. Conclusions There was evidence of an association between low perceived social support and induced abortion among women aged 18 to 25 years. Incidence of induced abortion was similar or even greater than rates of countries where abortion is legal. Strategies to increase social support and reduce induced abortion rates are needed.
dc.formatapplication/pdfes
dc.language.isoenges
dc.publisherPLoS ONEes
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0192764es
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses
dc.sourceUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)es_PE
dc.sourceRepositorio Academico - UPCes_PE
dc.subjectMaternal healthes
dc.subjectTermination of pregnancyes
dc.subjectCopulationes
dc.subjectEducational attainmentes
dc.subjectChildrenes
dc.subjectContraceptiveses
dc.subjectMiscarriagees
dc.subjectPerues
dc.titleAssociation between perceived social support and induced abortion: A study in maternal health centers in Lima, Perues
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees
dc.identifier.journalPLOS ONEes
dc.description.peerreviewRevisión por pareses_PE
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-15T21:33:24Z
html.description.abstractObjectives This study aimed to assess the association between perceived social support and induced abortion among young women in Lima, Peru. In addition, prevalence and incidence of induced abortion was estimated. Methods/Principal findings A cross-sectional study enrolling women aged 18–25 years from maternal health centers in Southern Lima, Peru, was conducted. Induced abortion was defined as the difference between the total number of pregnancies ended in abortion and the number of spontaneous abortions; whereas perceived social support was assessed using the DUKE-UNC scale. Prevalence and incidence of induced abortion (per 100 person-years risk) was estimated, and the association of interest was evaluated using Poisson regression models with robust variance. A total of 298 women were enrolled, mean age 21.7 (± 2.2) years. Low levels of social support were found in 43.6% (95%CI 38.0%–49.3%), and 17.4% (95%CI: 13.1%–21.8%) women reported at least one induced abortion. The incidence of induced abortion was 2.37 (95%CI: 1.81–3.11) per 100 person-years risk. The multivariable model showed evidence of the association between low perceived social support and induced abortion (RR = 1.94; 95%CI: 1.14–3.30) after controlling for confounders. Conclusions There was evidence of an association between low perceived social support and induced abortion among women aged 18 to 25 years. Incidence of induced abortion was similar or even greater than rates of countries where abortion is legal. Strategies to increase social support and reduce induced abortion rates are needed.


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