Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFuhs, Amy K.*
dc.contributor.authorLaGrone, Lacey N.*
dc.contributor.authorMoscoso Porras, Miguel G.*
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez Castro, Manuel J.*
dc.contributor.authorEcos Quispe, Rosa Lizbeth*
dc.contributor.authorMock, Charles N.*
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-28T16:06:09Z
dc.date.available2018-01-28T16:06:09Z
dc.date.issued2017-11
dc.identifier.citationAssessment of Rehabilitation Infrastructure in Peru 2017 Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitationes
dc.identifier.issn00039993
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.apmr.2017.10.020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/622600
dc.descriptionEl texto completo de este trabajo no está disponible en el Repositorio Académico UPC por restricciones de la casa editorial donde ha sido publicado.es_PE
dc.description.abstractObjective: To assess rehabilitation infrastructure in Peru in terms of the World Health Organization (WHO) health systems building blocks. Design: Anonymous quantitative survey; questions were based on the WHO's Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care and rehabilitation professionals' input. Setting: Large public hospitals and referral centers and an online survey platform. Participants: Convenience sample of hospital personnel working in rehabilitation and neurology (N=239), recruited through existing contacts and professional societies. Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: Outcome measures were for 4 WHO domains: health workforce, health service delivery, essential medical products and technologies, and health information systems. Results: Regarding the domain of health workforce, 47% of physical therapists, 50% of occupational therapists, and 22% of physiatrists never see inpatients. Few reported rehabilitative nurses (15%) or prosthetist/orthotists (14%) at their hospitals. Even at the largest hospitals, most reported ≤3 occupational therapists (54%) and speech-language pathologists (70%). At hospitals without speech-language pathologists, physical therapists (49%) or nobody (34%) perform speech-language pathology roles. At hospitals without occupational therapists, physical therapists most commonly (59%) perform occupational therapy tasks. Alternate prosthetist/orthotist task performers are occupational therapists (26%), physical therapists (19%), and physicians (16%). Forty-four percent reported interdisciplinary collaboration. Regarding the domain of health services, the most frequent inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation barriers were referral delays (50%) and distance/transportation (39%), respectively. Regarding the domain of health information systems, 28% reported rehabilitation service data collection. Regarding the domain of essential medical products and technologies, electrophysical agents (88%), gyms (81%), and electromyography (76%) were most common; thickened liquids (19%), swallow studies (24%), and cognitive training tools (28%) were least frequent. Conclusions: Rehabilitation emphasis is on outpatient services, and there are comparatively adequate numbers of physical therapists and physiatrists relative to rehabilitation personnel. Financial barriers seem low for accessing existing services. There appear to be shortages of inpatient rehabilitation, specialized services, and interdisciplinary collaboration. These may be addressed by redistributing personnel and investing in education and equipment for specialized services. Further examination of task sharing's role in Peru's rehabilitation services is necessary to evaluate its potential to address deficiencies. © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine.
dc.formatapplication/pdfes
dc.language.isoenges
dc.publisherW.B. Saunderses
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S000399931731359Xes
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccesses
dc.sourceUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)es_PE
dc.sourceRepositorio Académico - UPCes_PE
dc.subjectHealth information systemses
dc.subjectHealth personneles
dc.subjectHealth serviceses
dc.subjectInterdisciplinary communicationes
dc.subjectOccupational therapyes
dc.subjectPerues
dc.subjectPhysical and rehabilitation medicinees
dc.subjectPhysical therapistses
dc.subjectRehabilitationes
dc.subjectRehabilitation nursinges
dc.subjectSpeech-language pathologyes
dc.subjectWorld Health Organizationes
dc.titleAssessment of Rehabilitation Infrastructure in Perues
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees
dc.identifier.journalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitationes
dc.description.peerreviewRevisión por pareses_PE
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-16T02:27:27Z
html.description.abstractObjective: To assess rehabilitation infrastructure in Peru in terms of the World Health Organization (WHO) health systems building blocks. Design: Anonymous quantitative survey; questions were based on the WHO's Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care and rehabilitation professionals' input. Setting: Large public hospitals and referral centers and an online survey platform. Participants: Convenience sample of hospital personnel working in rehabilitation and neurology (N=239), recruited through existing contacts and professional societies. Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: Outcome measures were for 4 WHO domains: health workforce, health service delivery, essential medical products and technologies, and health information systems. Results: Regarding the domain of health workforce, 47% of physical therapists, 50% of occupational therapists, and 22% of physiatrists never see inpatients. Few reported rehabilitative nurses (15%) or prosthetist/orthotists (14%) at their hospitals. Even at the largest hospitals, most reported ≤3 occupational therapists (54%) and speech-language pathologists (70%). At hospitals without speech-language pathologists, physical therapists (49%) or nobody (34%) perform speech-language pathology roles. At hospitals without occupational therapists, physical therapists most commonly (59%) perform occupational therapy tasks. Alternate prosthetist/orthotist task performers are occupational therapists (26%), physical therapists (19%), and physicians (16%). Forty-four percent reported interdisciplinary collaboration. Regarding the domain of health services, the most frequent inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation barriers were referral delays (50%) and distance/transportation (39%), respectively. Regarding the domain of health information systems, 28% reported rehabilitation service data collection. Regarding the domain of essential medical products and technologies, electrophysical agents (88%), gyms (81%), and electromyography (76%) were most common; thickened liquids (19%), swallow studies (24%), and cognitive training tools (28%) were least frequent. Conclusions: Rehabilitation emphasis is on outpatient services, and there are comparatively adequate numbers of physical therapists and physiatrists relative to rehabilitation personnel. Financial barriers seem low for accessing existing services. There appear to be shortages of inpatient rehabilitation, specialized services, and interdisciplinary collaboration. These may be addressed by redistributing personnel and investing in education and equipment for specialized services. Further examination of task sharing's role in Peru's rehabilitation services is necessary to evaluate its potential to address deficiencies. © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Publisher version
Thumbnail
Name:
10.1016j.apmr.2017.10.020.pdf
Size:
279.5Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record