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dc.contributor.authorBernabe-Ortiz, Antonio*
dc.contributor.authorDiez-Canseco, Francisco*
dc.contributor.authorVasquez, Alberto*
dc.contributor.authorKuper, Hannah*
dc.contributor.authorWalsham, Matthew*
dc.contributor.authorBlanchet, Karl*
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-04T14:15:45Z
dc.date.available2018-01-04T14:15:45Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-26
dc.identifier.citationInclusion of persons with disabilities in systems of social protection: a population-based survey and case–control study in Peru 2016, 6 (8):e011300 BMJ Openes
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011300
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/622480
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: This study aims to assess the needs of people with disabilities and their level of inclusion in social protection programmes. DESIGN: Population based-survey with a nested case-control study. SETTING: Morropon, a semiurban district located in Piura, northern Peru. PARTICIPANTS: For the population survey, a two-stage sampling method was undertaken using data from the most updated census available and information of each household member aged ≥5 years was collected. In the nested case-control study, only one participant, case or control, per household was included in the study. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Disability was screened using the Washington Group short questionnaire. A case, defined as an individual aged ≥5 years with disabilities, was matched with one control without disabilities by sex and age (±5 years). Information was collected on socioeconomic status, education, health and rehabilitation and social protection participation. RESULTS: The survey included 3684 participants, 1848 (50.1%) females, mean age: 36.4 (SD: 21.7). A total of 290 participants (7.9%; 95% CI 7.0% to 8.7%) were classified as having disability. Adults with disabilities were more likely to be single (OR=3.40; 95% CI 1.54 to 7.51) and not to be working (OR=4.36; 95% CI 2.26 to 8.40), while those who did work were less likely to receive the national minimum wage (ie, 750 PEN or about US$265; p=0.007). People with disabilities were more likely to experience health problems. There was no difference between those enrolled in any social protection programme among participants with and without disabilities. CONCLUSIONS: People with disabilities were found to have higher needs for social protection, but were not more likely to be enrolled in social protection programmes. The Peruvian social protection system should consider adding disability status to selection criteria in their cash transfer programmes as well as implementing disability-specific interventions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/
dc.formatapplication/pdfes
dc.language.isoenges
dc.publisherBritish Medical Journales
dc.relation.urlhttp://bmjopen.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011300es
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses
dc.subjectEpidemiologyes
dc.subjectPublic Healthes
dc.subjectSocial Medicinees
dc.titleInclusion of persons with disabilities in systems of social protection: a population-based survey and case–control study in Perues
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees
dc.identifier.journalBMJ Openes
dc.description.peerreviewRevisión por pareses
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-16T11:19:32Z
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: This study aims to assess the needs of people with disabilities and their level of inclusion in social protection programmes. DESIGN: Population based-survey with a nested case-control study. SETTING: Morropon, a semiurban district located in Piura, northern Peru. PARTICIPANTS: For the population survey, a two-stage sampling method was undertaken using data from the most updated census available and information of each household member aged ≥5 years was collected. In the nested case-control study, only one participant, case or control, per household was included in the study. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Disability was screened using the Washington Group short questionnaire. A case, defined as an individual aged ≥5 years with disabilities, was matched with one control without disabilities by sex and age (±5 years). Information was collected on socioeconomic status, education, health and rehabilitation and social protection participation. RESULTS: The survey included 3684 participants, 1848 (50.1%) females, mean age: 36.4 (SD: 21.7). A total of 290 participants (7.9%; 95% CI 7.0% to 8.7%) were classified as having disability. Adults with disabilities were more likely to be single (OR=3.40; 95% CI 1.54 to 7.51) and not to be working (OR=4.36; 95% CI 2.26 to 8.40), while those who did work were less likely to receive the national minimum wage (ie, 750 PEN or about US$265; p=0.007). People with disabilities were more likely to experience health problems. There was no difference between those enrolled in any social protection programme among participants with and without disabilities. CONCLUSIONS: People with disabilities were found to have higher needs for social protection, but were not more likely to be enrolled in social protection programmes. The Peruvian social protection system should consider adding disability status to selection criteria in their cash transfer programmes as well as implementing disability-specific interventions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/


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