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dc.contributor.authorAlmenara, Carlos A.es
dc.contributor.authorAimé, A.es
dc.contributor.authorMaïano, C.es
dc.contributor.authorEjova, A.es
dc.contributor.authorGuèvremont, G.es
dc.contributor.authorBournival, C.es
dc.contributor.authorRicard, M.-M.es
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-19T20:04:20Z
dc.date.available2017-10-19T20:04:20Z
dc.date.issued2017-05
dc.identifier.citationWeight stigmatization and disordered eating in obese women: The mediating effects of self-esteem and fear of negative appearance evaluation 2017, 67 (3):155 Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée/European Review of Applied Psychologyes
dc.identifier.issn11629088
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.erap.2017.02.004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/622264
dc.descriptionEl texto completo de este trabajo no está disponible en el Repositorio Académico UPC por restricciones de la casa editorial donde ha sido publicado.es_PE
dc.description.abstractObjective The aim of this study is to examine whether self-esteem and fear of negative appearance evaluation are significant mediators in the association between weight-related self-devaluation and disordered eating. Method A sample of obese Canadian women (N = 111, M age = 40.9, SD = 10.2) completed the Weight Self-Stigma Questionnaire (WSSQ), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), the Fear of Negative Appearance Evaluation Scale (FNAES), and the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q). Results Self-esteem mediated the relationship between weight-related self-devaluation and restraint and weight concerns, whereas fear of negative appearance evaluation mediated the relationship with weight, shape and eating concerns. Conclusion Since, for obese women, self-esteem and fear of negative appearance evaluation are likely to maintain disordered eating, they should be more frequently taken into consideration by researchers, health professionals and public policy stakeholders.
dc.formatapplication/pdfes
dc.language.isofraes
dc.publisherElsevier Masson SASes
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1162908817300324es
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccesses
dc.subjectDisordered eatinges
dc.subjectFear of negative appearance evaluationes
dc.subjectObesityes
dc.subjectSelf-esteemes
dc.subjectSelf-stigmatizationes
dc.titleWeight stigmatization and disordered eating in obese women: The mediating effects of self-esteem and fear of negative appearance evaluationes
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees
dc.identifier.journalRevue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée/European Review of Applied Psychologyes
dc.description.peerreviewRevisión por pareses_PE
dc.contributor.emailg.guevremont@muula.caes_PE
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-16T22:50:20Z
html.description.abstractObjective The aim of this study is to examine whether self-esteem and fear of negative appearance evaluation are significant mediators in the association between weight-related self-devaluation and disordered eating. Method A sample of obese Canadian women (N = 111, M age = 40.9, SD = 10.2) completed the Weight Self-Stigma Questionnaire (WSSQ), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), the Fear of Negative Appearance Evaluation Scale (FNAES), and the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q). Results Self-esteem mediated the relationship between weight-related self-devaluation and restraint and weight concerns, whereas fear of negative appearance evaluation mediated the relationship with weight, shape and eating concerns. Conclusion Since, for obese women, self-esteem and fear of negative appearance evaluation are likely to maintain disordered eating, they should be more frequently taken into consideration by researchers, health professionals and public policy stakeholders.


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