Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorOrmaeche, Melvy*
dc.contributor.authorWhittembury, Alvaro*
dc.contributor.authorPun, Mónica*
dc.contributor.authorSuárez Ognio, Luis*
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-18T00:50:47Z
dc.date.available2014-07-18T00:50:47Z
dc.date.issued2014-07-17
dc.identifier.citationInt J Infect Dis. 2012 Oct;16(10):e724-30es_PE
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijid.2012.05.1032eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/323397es_PE
dc.descriptionmormaeche@dge.gob.pees_PE
dc.description.abstractObjective: To assess the seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV), syphilis, and HIV and associated risk factors in pregnant women and their male partners from six indigenous populations of the Peruvian Amazon Basin. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed in six indigenous populations from the Peruvian Amazon Basin. Blood samples were obtained and tested for HBV (antibodies to the hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)), for syphilis (rapid plasma reagin and microhemagglutination assay for Treponema pallidum antibodies), and for HIV (ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence test). A survey was also performed to identify associated risk factors. Results: One thousand two hundred and fifty-one pregnant women and 778 male partners were enrolled in the study. The seroprevalence of anti-HBc in pregnant women was 42.06% (95% confidence interval (CI) 39.28–44.85%) and in their male partners was 54.09% (95% CI 50.32–57.86%). The seroprevalence of HBsAg in pregnant women was 2.11% (95% CI 0.78–3.44%) and in their male partners was 3.98% (95% CI 1.87–6.08%). The seroprevalence of syphilis in pregnant women was 1.60% (95% CI 0.86–2.33%) and in their male partners was 2.44% (95% CI 1.22–3.66%). HIV seroprevalence in pregnant women was 0.16% (95% CI 0.02–0.58%) and in their male partners was 0.29% (95% CI 0.04–1.03%). Sexual risk factors were strongly related to blood markers of syphilis and HBV. Conclusions: Hepatitis B was found to be hyperendemic and strongly related to sexual factors, suggesting an important sexual component in the transmission of the disease in the populations studied. Syphilis was found to have an endemicity in pregnant women above the national level and this may be indicative of high mother-to-child transmission. HIV has started to show its presence in indigenous populations of the Amazon Basin and the results suggest the epidemic is concentrated.
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_PE
dc.language.isoenges_PE
dc.publisherElsevier B.V.es_PE
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22884008es_PE
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22884008es_PE
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_PE
dc.sourceUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)es_PE
dc.sourceRepositorio Académico - UPCes_PE
dc.subjectHepatitis B viruses_PE
dc.subjectHIVes_PE
dc.subjectSyphilises_PE
dc.subjectPregnancyes_PE
dc.subjectPerues_PE
dc.subjectAmazonases_PE
dc.subjectSexual Partnerses_PE
dc.subjectAntibodies, Bacteriales_PE
dc.subjectTreponema pallidumes_PE
dc.titleHepatitis B virus, syphilis, and HIV seroprevalence in pregnant women and their male partners from six indigenous populations of the Peruvian Amazon Basin, 2007–2008es_PE
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_PE
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Infectious Diseaseses_PE
dc.description.peer-reviewRevisión por pareses_PE
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-16T10:01:40Z
html.description.abstractObjective: To assess the seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV), syphilis, and HIV and associated risk factors in pregnant women and their male partners from six indigenous populations of the Peruvian Amazon Basin. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed in six indigenous populations from the Peruvian Amazon Basin. Blood samples were obtained and tested for HBV (antibodies to the hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)), for syphilis (rapid plasma reagin and microhemagglutination assay for Treponema pallidum antibodies), and for HIV (ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence test). A survey was also performed to identify associated risk factors. Results: One thousand two hundred and fifty-one pregnant women and 778 male partners were enrolled in the study. The seroprevalence of anti-HBc in pregnant women was 42.06% (95% confidence interval (CI) 39.28–44.85%) and in their male partners was 54.09% (95% CI 50.32–57.86%). The seroprevalence of HBsAg in pregnant women was 2.11% (95% CI 0.78–3.44%) and in their male partners was 3.98% (95% CI 1.87–6.08%). The seroprevalence of syphilis in pregnant women was 1.60% (95% CI 0.86–2.33%) and in their male partners was 2.44% (95% CI 1.22–3.66%). HIV seroprevalence in pregnant women was 0.16% (95% CI 0.02–0.58%) and in their male partners was 0.29% (95% CI 0.04–1.03%). Sexual risk factors were strongly related to blood markers of syphilis and HBV. Conclusions: Hepatitis B was found to be hyperendemic and strongly related to sexual factors, suggesting an important sexual component in the transmission of the disease in the populations studied. Syphilis was found to have an endemicity in pregnant women above the national level and this may be indicative of high mother-to-child transmission. HIV has started to show its presence in indigenous populations of the Amazon Basin and the results suggest the epidemic is concentrated.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Publisher version
Thumbnail
Name:
HepatitisBvirus.pdf
Size:
239.5Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record