Perceived stress and high fat intake: A study in a sample of undergraduate students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/623068
Title:
Perceived stress and high fat intake: A study in a sample of undergraduate students
Authors:
Vidal, E. Jair; Alvarez, Daily; Martinez-Velarde, Dalia; Vidal-Damas, Lorena; Yuncar-Rojas, Kelly A.; Julca-Malca, Alesia; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio ( 0000-0002-6834-1376 )
Citation:
Perceived stress and high fat intake: A study in a sample of undergraduate students 2018, 13 (3):e0192827 PLOS ONE
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Journal:
PLOS ONE
Issue Date:
9-Mar-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/623068
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0192827
Additional Links:
http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0192827
Abstract:
Objectives Different studies have reported the association between perceived stress and unhealthy diet choices. We aimed to determine whether there is a relationship between perceived stress and fat intake among undergraduate medical students. Methods/Principal findings A cross-sectional study was performed including first-year medical students. The outcome of interest was the self-report of fat intake assessed using the Block Screening Questionnaire for Fat Intake (high vs. low intake), whereas the exposure was perceived stress (low/ normal vs. high levels). The prevalence of high fat intake was estimated and the association of interest was determined using prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Models were created utilizing Poisson regression with robust standard errors. Data from 523 students were analyzed, 52.0% female, mean age 19.0 (SD 1.7) years. The prevalence of high fat intake was 42.4% (CI: 38.2%–46.7%). In multivariate model and compared with those with lowest levels of stress, those in the middle (PR = 1.59; 95%CI: 1.20–2.12) and highest (PR = 1.92; 95%CI: 1.46–2.53) categories of perceived stress had greater prevalence of fat intake. Gender was an effect modifier of this association (p = 0.008). Conclusions Greater levels of perceived stress were associated with higher fat intake, and this association was stronger among males. More than 40% of students reported having high fat consumption. Our results suggest the need to implement strategies that promote decreased fat intake.
Type:
info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights:
info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
Language:
eng
Keywords:
Adult; Cross-sectional study; Error; Fat intake; Female; Gender; Human; Major clinical study; Male; Medical student; Outcome assessment; Perceived Stress Scale; Prevalence; Questionnaires; Self report; Stress; undergraduate student; young adult
ISSN:
1932-6203

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVidal, E. Jaires
dc.contributor.authorAlvarez, Dailyes
dc.contributor.authorMartinez-Velarde, Daliaes
dc.contributor.authorVidal-Damas, Lorenaes
dc.contributor.authorYuncar-Rojas, Kelly A.es
dc.contributor.authorJulca-Malca, Alesiaes
dc.contributor.authorBernabe-Ortiz, Antonioes
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-04T17:11:06Z-
dc.date.available2018-04-04T17:11:06Z-
dc.date.issued2018-03-09-
dc.identifier.citationPerceived stress and high fat intake: A study in a sample of undergraduate students 2018, 13 (3):e0192827 PLOS ONEes
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0192827-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/623068-
dc.description.abstractObjectives Different studies have reported the association between perceived stress and unhealthy diet choices. We aimed to determine whether there is a relationship between perceived stress and fat intake among undergraduate medical students. Methods/Principal findings A cross-sectional study was performed including first-year medical students. The outcome of interest was the self-report of fat intake assessed using the Block Screening Questionnaire for Fat Intake (high vs. low intake), whereas the exposure was perceived stress (low/ normal vs. high levels). The prevalence of high fat intake was estimated and the association of interest was determined using prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Models were created utilizing Poisson regression with robust standard errors. Data from 523 students were analyzed, 52.0% female, mean age 19.0 (SD 1.7) years. The prevalence of high fat intake was 42.4% (CI: 38.2%–46.7%). In multivariate model and compared with those with lowest levels of stress, those in the middle (PR = 1.59; 95%CI: 1.20–2.12) and highest (PR = 1.92; 95%CI: 1.46–2.53) categories of perceived stress had greater prevalence of fat intake. Gender was an effect modifier of this association (p = 0.008). Conclusions Greater levels of perceived stress were associated with higher fat intake, and this association was stronger among males. More than 40% of students reported having high fat consumption. Our results suggest the need to implement strategies that promote decreased fat intake.es
dc.formatapplication/pdfes
dc.language.isoenges
dc.publisherPublic Library of Sciencees
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0192827es
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses
dc.sourceUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)es_PE
dc.sourceRepositorio Academico - UPCes_PE
dc.subjectAdultes
dc.subjectCross-sectional studyes
dc.subjectErrores
dc.subjectFat intakees
dc.subjectFemalees
dc.subjectGenderes
dc.subjectHumanes
dc.subjectMajor clinical studyes
dc.subjectMalees
dc.subjectMedical studentes
dc.subjectOutcome assessmentes
dc.subjectPerceived Stress Scalees
dc.subjectPrevalencees
dc.subjectQuestionnaireses
dc.subjectSelf reportes
dc.subjectStresses
dc.subjectundergraduate studentes
dc.subjectyoung adultes
dc.titlePerceived stress and high fat intake: A study in a sample of undergraduate studentses
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees
dc.identifier.journalPLOS ONEes
dc.description.peerreviewRevisión por pareses_PE
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