Effect of exercise on sleep quality and insomnia in middle-aged women: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/622341
Title:
Effect of exercise on sleep quality and insomnia in middle-aged women: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
Authors:
Rubio-Arias, Jacobo Á.; Marín-Cascales, Elena; Ramos-Campo, Domingo J.; Hernandez, Adrian V. ( 0000-0002-9999-4003 ) ; Pérez-López, Faustino R.
Citation:
Effect of exercise on sleep quality and insomnia in middle-aged women: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials 2017, 100:49 Maturitas
Publisher:
Elsevier Ireland Ltd
Journal:
Maturitas
Issue Date:
Jun-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/622341
DOI:
10.1016/j.maturitas.2017.04.003
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378512217304838
Abstract:
Objective We assessed the effects of programmed exercise (PE) on sleep quality and insomnia in middle-aged women (MAW). Methods Searches were conducted in five databases from inception through December 15, 2016 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of PE versus a non-exercising control condition on sleep quality, sleep disturbance and/or insomnia in MAW. Interventions had to last at least 8 weeks. Sleep quality was assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and insomnia with the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Random effects models were used for meta-analyses. The effects on outcomes were expressed as mean differences (MDs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Five publications reported data from four RCTs on PE effects during 12–16 weeks on sleep quality (n = 4 studies reporting PSQI results) and/or insomnia (n = 3 studies reporting ISI results), including 660 MAW. Low-moderate levels of exercise significantly lowered the PSQI score (MD = −1.34; 95% CI −2.67, 0.00; p = 0.05) compared with controls. In a subgroup analysis, moderate PE (aerobic exercise) had a positive effect on sleep quality (PSQI score MD = −1.85; 95% CI −3.62, −0.07; p = 0.04), while low levels of physical activity (yoga) did not have a significant effect (MD-0.46, 95% CI −1.79, 0.88, p = 0.50). In three studies (two studies of yoga, one study of aerobic exercise), there was a non-significant reduction in the severity of insomnia measured with the ISI score (MD −1.44, 95% CI −3.28, 0. 44, p = 0.13) compared with controls. Heterogeneity of effects among studies was moderate to high. Conclusion In middle-aged women, programmed exercise improved sleep quality but had no significant effect on the severity of insomnia.
Type:
info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights:
info:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccess
Language:
eng
Description:
El texto completo de este trabajo no está disponible en el Repositorio Académico UPC por restricciones de la casa editorial donde ha sido publicado.
Keywords:
Exercise; Insomnia; Insomnia severity index; Middle-aged women; Pittsburgh sleep quality index; Yoga
ISSN:
03785122

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRubio-Arias, Jacobo Á.es
dc.contributor.authorMarín-Cascales, Elenaes
dc.contributor.authorRamos-Campo, Domingo J.es
dc.contributor.authorHernandez, Adrian V.es
dc.contributor.authorPérez-López, Faustino R.es
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-31T16:56:36Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-31T16:56:36Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-
dc.identifier.citationEffect of exercise on sleep quality and insomnia in middle-aged women: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials 2017, 100:49 Maturitases
dc.identifier.issn03785122-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.maturitas.2017.04.003-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/622341-
dc.descriptionEl texto completo de este trabajo no está disponible en el Repositorio Académico UPC por restricciones de la casa editorial donde ha sido publicado.es
dc.description.abstractObjective We assessed the effects of programmed exercise (PE) on sleep quality and insomnia in middle-aged women (MAW). Methods Searches were conducted in five databases from inception through December 15, 2016 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of PE versus a non-exercising control condition on sleep quality, sleep disturbance and/or insomnia in MAW. Interventions had to last at least 8 weeks. Sleep quality was assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and insomnia with the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Random effects models were used for meta-analyses. The effects on outcomes were expressed as mean differences (MDs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Five publications reported data from four RCTs on PE effects during 12–16 weeks on sleep quality (n = 4 studies reporting PSQI results) and/or insomnia (n = 3 studies reporting ISI results), including 660 MAW. Low-moderate levels of exercise significantly lowered the PSQI score (MD = −1.34; 95% CI −2.67, 0.00; p = 0.05) compared with controls. In a subgroup analysis, moderate PE (aerobic exercise) had a positive effect on sleep quality (PSQI score MD = −1.85; 95% CI −3.62, −0.07; p = 0.04), while low levels of physical activity (yoga) did not have a significant effect (MD-0.46, 95% CI −1.79, 0.88, p = 0.50). In three studies (two studies of yoga, one study of aerobic exercise), there was a non-significant reduction in the severity of insomnia measured with the ISI score (MD −1.44, 95% CI −3.28, 0. 44, p = 0.13) compared with controls. Heterogeneity of effects among studies was moderate to high. Conclusion In middle-aged women, programmed exercise improved sleep quality but had no significant effect on the severity of insomnia.es
dc.formatapplication/pdfes
dc.language.isoenges
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltdes
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378512217304838es
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccesses
dc.subjectExercisees
dc.subjectInsomniaes
dc.subjectInsomnia severity indexes
dc.subjectMiddle-aged womenes
dc.subjectPittsburgh sleep quality indexes
dc.subjectYogaes
dc.titleEffect of exercise on sleep quality and insomnia in middle-aged women: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trialses
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees
dc.identifier.journalMaturitases
dc.description.peerreviewRevisión por pareses_PE
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