Gender associated with the intention to choose a medical specialty in medical students: a cross-sectional study in 11 countries in Latin America

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/621794
Title:
Gender associated with the intention to choose a medical specialty in medical students: a cross-sectional study in 11 countries in Latin America
Authors:
Ng-Sueng, Luis Fernando ( 0000-0001-9835-2669 ) ; Vargas Matos, Ivan
Advisors:
Mayta-Tristan, Percy ( 0000-0002-0861-6606 )
Publisher:
Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)
Issue Date:
20-Feb-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/621794
Abstract:
Introduction: The selection of a medical specialty has been associated with multiple factors, such as personal preferences, academic exposure, motivational factors and sociodemographic factors, such as gender. The number of women in the medical field has increased in recent years. In Latin America, we have not found any studies that explore this relationship. Objective: To determine whether there is an association between gender and the intention to choose a medical specialty in medical students from 11 countries in Latin America. Methods: Secondary analysis of Latin American Collaborative Research Group in Human Resources in Health (Red-LIRHUS) data, a multi-centric census of students in their first year and fifth year of medicine, from 63 medical schools in 11 countries in Latin America. All students who had indicated wanting to choose a specialty and who chose a specific specialty were considered as participants. Results: Of the 11,072 surveyed, 9,235 indicated wanting to choose a specialty and indicated the name of a specific specialty. The specialties most often chosen in the fifth year were General Surgery (13.0%), Pediatrics (11.3%), Internal Medicine (10.3%) and Obstetrics and Gynecology (9.2%). For women, the top choices were Pediatrics (17.3%), Obstetrics and Gynecology (10.8%), Cardiology (8.9%), General Surgery (8.7%), and Oncology (6.5%). In the adjusted analysis, the female gender was associated with the choice of Gynecology (RP: 2.75; IC95%: 2.24-3.38); Pediatric Surgery (RP: 2.18; IC95%: 1.19-3.99), Dermatology (RP: 1.90; IC95%:1.23-2.93), Pediatrics (RP: 1.83; IC95%: 1.55-2.17), and Oncology (RP: 1.37; IC95%: 1.10-1.71). Conclusions: There is an association between the female gender and the intention to choose Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, Pediatric Surgery, Dermatology, and Oncology. We recommend conducting studies that consider other factors that can influence the choice of a medical specialty
Type:
info:eu-repo/semantics/bachelorThesis
Rights:
info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
Language:
spa
Keywords:
Especialidad médica; Estudiantes de Medicina; Género; Latinoamérica

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorMayta-Tristan, Percyes
dc.contributor.authorNg-Sueng, Luis Fernandoes
dc.contributor.authorVargas Matos, Ivanes
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-17T14:52:24Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-17T14:52:24Z-
dc.date.issued2016-02-20-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/621794-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The selection of a medical specialty has been associated with multiple factors, such as personal preferences, academic exposure, motivational factors and sociodemographic factors, such as gender. The number of women in the medical field has increased in recent years. In Latin America, we have not found any studies that explore this relationship. Objective: To determine whether there is an association between gender and the intention to choose a medical specialty in medical students from 11 countries in Latin America. Methods: Secondary analysis of Latin American Collaborative Research Group in Human Resources in Health (Red-LIRHUS) data, a multi-centric census of students in their first year and fifth year of medicine, from 63 medical schools in 11 countries in Latin America. All students who had indicated wanting to choose a specialty and who chose a specific specialty were considered as participants. Results: Of the 11,072 surveyed, 9,235 indicated wanting to choose a specialty and indicated the name of a specific specialty. The specialties most often chosen in the fifth year were General Surgery (13.0%), Pediatrics (11.3%), Internal Medicine (10.3%) and Obstetrics and Gynecology (9.2%). For women, the top choices were Pediatrics (17.3%), Obstetrics and Gynecology (10.8%), Cardiology (8.9%), General Surgery (8.7%), and Oncology (6.5%). In the adjusted analysis, the female gender was associated with the choice of Gynecology (RP: 2.75; IC95%: 2.24-3.38); Pediatric Surgery (RP: 2.18; IC95%: 1.19-3.99), Dermatology (RP: 1.90; IC95%:1.23-2.93), Pediatrics (RP: 1.83; IC95%: 1.55-2.17), and Oncology (RP: 1.37; IC95%: 1.10-1.71). Conclusions: There is an association between the female gender and the intention to choose Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, Pediatric Surgery, Dermatology, and Oncology. We recommend conducting studies that consider other factors that can influence the choice of a medical specialtyes
dc.formatapplication/pdfes
dc.formatapplication/mswordes
dc.language.isospaes
dc.publisherUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)es
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses
dc.sourceUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)es_PE
dc.sourceRepositorio Académico - UPCes_PE
dc.subjectEspecialidad médicaes
dc.subjectEstudiantes de Medicinaes
dc.subjectGéneroes
dc.subjectLatinoaméricaes
dc.titleGender associated with the intention to choose a medical specialty in medical students: a cross-sectional study in 11 countries in Latin Americaes
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/bachelorThesises
thesis.degree.grantorUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC). Facultad de Ciencias de la Saludes_PE
thesis.degree.levelLicenciaturaes_PE
thesis.degree.disciplineMedicinaes_PE
thesis.degree.nameMédico cirujanoes_PE
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