“You better werk.” Camp representations of Rupaul’s Drag Race in Spanish subtitles

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/615516
Title:
“You better werk.” Camp representations of Rupaul’s Drag Race in Spanish subtitles
Authors:
Villanueva Jordán, Iván
Citation:
“You better werk.” Camp representations of Rupaul’s Drag Race in Spanish subtitles 2015, 60 (2):376 Meta: Journal des traducteurs
Publisher:
Consortium Érudit
Journal:
Meta: Journal des traducteurs
Issue Date:
Apr-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/615516
DOI:
10.7202/1032927ar
Additional Links:
http://id.erudit.org/iderudit/1032927ar
Abstract:
Condragulations, fierce, realness, werk or «Shante, you stay» are only some of the expressions from the contestants’ lexicon of RuPaul’s Drag Race (RPDR), a popular reality television show that started airing in 2009 in the USA. Through an academic lens, the study of this type of expression was anecdotally called “lavender linguistics,” during the first explorations of the sexual minorities’ ways of talking. Since then and till now, concepts related to gender, sexuality, and the works of representation have influenced both linguistics and Translation Studies, which in turn has led to critical perspectives on translation, identity transfer, acculturation and, of course, the way language works. This paper begins by briefly referring to drag queens living in Lima, Peru, and how they have changed the way they talk to each other and about themselves. As will be argued, a cultural product such as RPDR and the necessary interlingual subtitling into Spanish –commercial or fan-made– have been influencing their linguistic engagement. Further on, the concepts of camp and camp talk will be presented as they were first introduced to Translation Studies with the work of Keith Harvey during the late 1990’s. Camp representations will be then analyzed in commercial and fan-made subtitles to reveal the semiotic and pragmatic constraints resulting from cultural-specific gay identities. From this first approach, new inquiries on audiovisual translations in general and identity acculturation in particular will be proposed.
Type:
info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights:
info:eu-repo/semantics/embargoedAccess
Language:
fra
Description:
El texto completo de este trabajo no está disponible en el Repositorio Académico UPC por restricciones de la casa editorial donde ha sido publicado.
Keywords:
Expresiones culturales; Drag Race; Tv show
ISSN:
0026-0452; 1492-1421
Email:
ivan.villanueva@upc.edu.pe

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVillanueva Jordán, Ivánes_PE
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-04T19:47:03Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-04T19:47:03Z-
dc.date.issued2015-04-
dc.identifier.citation“You better werk.” Camp representations of Rupaul’s Drag Race in Spanish subtitles 2015, 60 (2):376 Meta: Journal des traducteurses_PE
dc.identifier.issn0026-0452-
dc.identifier.issn1492-1421-
dc.identifier.doi10.7202/1032927ar-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/615516-
dc.descriptionEl texto completo de este trabajo no está disponible en el Repositorio Académico UPC por restricciones de la casa editorial donde ha sido publicado.es_PE
dc.description.abstractCondragulations, fierce, realness, werk or «Shante, you stay» are only some of the expressions from the contestants’ lexicon of RuPaul’s Drag Race (RPDR), a popular reality television show that started airing in 2009 in the USA. Through an academic lens, the study of this type of expression was anecdotally called “lavender linguistics,” during the first explorations of the sexual minorities’ ways of talking. Since then and till now, concepts related to gender, sexuality, and the works of representation have influenced both linguistics and Translation Studies, which in turn has led to critical perspectives on translation, identity transfer, acculturation and, of course, the way language works. This paper begins by briefly referring to drag queens living in Lima, Peru, and how they have changed the way they talk to each other and about themselves. As will be argued, a cultural product such as RPDR and the necessary interlingual subtitling into Spanish –commercial or fan-made– have been influencing their linguistic engagement. Further on, the concepts of camp and camp talk will be presented as they were first introduced to Translation Studies with the work of Keith Harvey during the late 1990’s. Camp representations will be then analyzed in commercial and fan-made subtitles to reveal the semiotic and pragmatic constraints resulting from cultural-specific gay identities. From this first approach, new inquiries on audiovisual translations in general and identity acculturation in particular will be proposed.es_PE
dc.formatapplication/htmles_PE
dc.language.isofraes_PE
dc.publisherConsortium Érudites_PE
dc.relation.urlhttp://id.erudit.org/iderudit/1032927ares_PE
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/embargoedAccesses_PE
dc.sourceUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)es_PE
dc.sourceRepositorio Académico - UPCes_PE
dc.subjectExpresiones culturaleses_PE
dc.subjectDrag Racees_PE
dc.subjectTv showes_PE
dc.title“You better werk.” Camp representations of Rupaul’s Drag Race in Spanish subtitleses_PE
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_PE
dc.identifier.journalMeta: Journal des traducteurses_PE
dc.description.peer-reviewRevisión por pareses_PE
dc.contributor.emailivan.villanueva@upc.edu.pees_PE
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