Psychometric Properties of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in a Cohort of Peruvian Pregnant Women.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/611656
Title:
Psychometric Properties of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in a Cohort of Peruvian Pregnant Women.
Authors:
Zhong, Qiu-Yue; Gelaye, Bizu; Sánchez, Sixto E; Williams, Michelle A
Citation:
Psychometric Properties of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in a Cohort of Peruvian Pregnant Women. 2015, 11 (8):869-77 J Clin Sleep Med
Publisher:
American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Journal:
Journal of clinical sleep medicine (J Clin Sleep Med)
Issue Date:
Aug-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/611656
DOI:
10.5664/jcsm.4936
PubMed ID:
25845902
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25845902
Abstract:
STUDY OBJECTIVES: We sought to evaluate the construct validity and factor structure of the Spanish-language version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) among pregnant Peruvian women. METHODS: A cohort of 642 women were interviewed at ≤ 16 weeks of gestation. During interview, we ascertained information about lifestyles, demographics, sleep characteristics, and mood symptoms. Stress induced sleep disturbance, depressive symptoms, and anxiety symptoms were evaluated using the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (FIRST), Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) assessment scales, respectively. Consistency indices, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, correlations, and logistic regressions were used. RESULTS: Both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses indicated a three-factor solution: sleep quality, sleep efficiency, and sleep medication. We observed significantly positive correlations of the PSQI with the FIRST (0.42), the PHQ-9 (0.49), and the GAD-7 (0.46). Poor sleepers (PSQI global score > 5) had significantly increased odds of experiencing stress-induced sleep disturbance (odds ratio, OR = 3.57; 95% CI: 2.40, 5.31), depression (OR = 5.48; 95% CI: 3.58, 8.37), and generalized anxiety disorder (OR = 4.57; 95% CI: 3.08, 6.76). CONCLUSION: The Spanish-language version of the PSQI instrument was found to have good construct validity among pregnant Peruvian women. Consistent with some other studies, the PSQI was found to have a three-factor structure. Further assessment and validation studies are needed to determine whether the three, factor-specific scoring of the PSQI is favored over the PSQI global score in diverse populations.
Type:
info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights:
info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
Language:
eng
Keywords:
Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; Psychometric properties; Pregnant women; Sleep; Sueños
ISSN:
1550-9397

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZhong, Qiu-Yuees_PE
dc.contributor.authorGelaye, Bizues_PE
dc.contributor.authorSánchez, Sixto Ees_PE
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Michelle Aes_PE
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-02T23:01:16Zes_PE
dc.date.available2016-06-02T23:01:16Zes_PE
dc.date.issued2015-08es_PE
dc.identifier.citationPsychometric Properties of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in a Cohort of Peruvian Pregnant Women. 2015, 11 (8):869-77 J Clin Sleep Medes_PE
dc.identifier.issn1550-9397es_PE
dc.identifier.pmid25845902es_PE
dc.identifier.doi10.5664/jcsm.4936es_PE
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/611656es_PE
dc.description.abstractSTUDY OBJECTIVES: We sought to evaluate the construct validity and factor structure of the Spanish-language version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) among pregnant Peruvian women. METHODS: A cohort of 642 women were interviewed at ≤ 16 weeks of gestation. During interview, we ascertained information about lifestyles, demographics, sleep characteristics, and mood symptoms. Stress induced sleep disturbance, depressive symptoms, and anxiety symptoms were evaluated using the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (FIRST), Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) assessment scales, respectively. Consistency indices, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, correlations, and logistic regressions were used. RESULTS: Both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses indicated a three-factor solution: sleep quality, sleep efficiency, and sleep medication. We observed significantly positive correlations of the PSQI with the FIRST (0.42), the PHQ-9 (0.49), and the GAD-7 (0.46). Poor sleepers (PSQI global score > 5) had significantly increased odds of experiencing stress-induced sleep disturbance (odds ratio, OR = 3.57; 95% CI: 2.40, 5.31), depression (OR = 5.48; 95% CI: 3.58, 8.37), and generalized anxiety disorder (OR = 4.57; 95% CI: 3.08, 6.76). CONCLUSION: The Spanish-language version of the PSQI instrument was found to have good construct validity among pregnant Peruvian women. Consistent with some other studies, the PSQI was found to have a three-factor structure. Further assessment and validation studies are needed to determine whether the three, factor-specific scoring of the PSQI is favored over the PSQI global score in diverse populations.es_PE
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_PE
dc.language.isoenges_PE
dc.publisherAmerican Academy of Sleep Medicinees_PE
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25845902es_PE
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_PE
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.sourceUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)es_PE
dc.sourceRepositorio Académico - UPCes_PE
dc.subjectPittsburgh Sleep Quality Index-
dc.subjectPsychometric properties-
dc.subjectPregnant women-
dc.subjectSleep-
dc.subjectSueños-
dc.titlePsychometric Properties of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in a Cohort of Peruvian Pregnant Women.es_PE
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_PE
dc.identifier.journalJournal of clinical sleep medicine (J Clin Sleep Med)es_PE
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dc.description.fundingThis was not an industry supported study. This research was supported by an award from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver Institute of Child Health and Human Development (R01-HD-059835) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The NIH had no further role in the study design; in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; and in the decision to submit the paper for publication. The authors have indicated no financial conflicts of interest.es_PE
dc.description.peer-reviewRevisión por pareses_PE
dc.subject.countryPeru-
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