The fecal virome of South and Central American children with diarrhea includes small circular DNA viral genomes of unknown origin.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/604552
Title:
The fecal virome of South and Central American children with diarrhea includes small circular DNA viral genomes of unknown origin.
Authors:
Phan, Tung Gia; da Costa, Antonio Charlys; Del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Bucardo Rivera, Filemon; Nordgren, Johan; O'Ryan, Miguel; Deng, Xutao; Delwart, Eric
Citation:
The fecal virome of South and Central American children with diarrhea includes small circular DNA viral genomes of unknown origin. 2016, 161 (4):959-66 Arch. Virol.
Publisher:
Springer International Publishing
Journal:
Archives of virology (Arch Virol.)
Issue Date:
Apr-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/604552
DOI:
10.1007/s00705-016-2756-4
PubMed ID:
26780893
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26780893
Abstract:
Viral metagenomics of feces collected from 58 Peruvian children with unexplained diarrhea revealed several small circular ssDNA genomes. Two genomes related to sequences previously reported in feces from chimpanzees and other mammals and recently named smacoviruses were characterized and then detected by PCR in 1.7 % (1/58) and 19 % (11/58) of diarrheal samples, respectively. Another three genomes from a distinct small circular ssDNA viral group provisionally called pecoviruses encoded Cap and Rep proteins with <35 % identity to those in related genomes reported in human, seal, porcine and dromedary feces. Pecovirus DNA was detected in 15.5 % (9/58), 5.9 % (3/51) and 3 % (3/100) of fecal samples from unexplained diarrhea in Peru, Nicaragua and Chile, respectively. Feces containing these ssDNA genomes also contained known human enteric viral pathogens. The cellular origins of these circular ssDNA viruses, whether human cells, ingested plants, animals or fungal foods, or residents of the gut microbiome, are currently unknown.
Type:
info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights:
info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
Language:
eng
Keywords:
Diarrhea; DNA viral genomes; Central American; South American
ISSN:
1432-8798
Sponsors:
This study was funded by NHLBI Grant R01 HL105770 to E.L.D and by Sao Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) Grant numbers 2014/05211-2 and 2012/03417-7 to A.C.C.
Email:
delwarte@medicine.ucsf.edu

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPhan, Tung Giaes_PE
dc.contributor.authorda Costa, Antonio Charlyses_PE
dc.contributor.authorDel Valle Mendoza, Juanaes_PE
dc.contributor.authorBucardo Rivera, Filemones_PE
dc.contributor.authorNordgren, Johanes_PE
dc.contributor.authorO'Ryan, Migueles_PE
dc.contributor.authorDeng, Xutaoes_PE
dc.contributor.authorDelwart, Erices_PE
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-05T17:54:13Zes_PE
dc.date.available2016-04-05T17:54:13Zes_PE
dc.date.issued2016-04es_PE
dc.identifier.citationThe fecal virome of South and Central American children with diarrhea includes small circular DNA viral genomes of unknown origin. 2016, 161 (4):959-66 Arch. Virol.es_PE
dc.identifier.issn1432-8798es_PE
dc.identifier.pmid26780893es_PE
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00705-016-2756-4es_PE
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/604552es_PE
dc.description.abstractViral metagenomics of feces collected from 58 Peruvian children with unexplained diarrhea revealed several small circular ssDNA genomes. Two genomes related to sequences previously reported in feces from chimpanzees and other mammals and recently named smacoviruses were characterized and then detected by PCR in 1.7 % (1/58) and 19 % (11/58) of diarrheal samples, respectively. Another three genomes from a distinct small circular ssDNA viral group provisionally called pecoviruses encoded Cap and Rep proteins with <35 % identity to those in related genomes reported in human, seal, porcine and dromedary feces. Pecovirus DNA was detected in 15.5 % (9/58), 5.9 % (3/51) and 3 % (3/100) of fecal samples from unexplained diarrhea in Peru, Nicaragua and Chile, respectively. Feces containing these ssDNA genomes also contained known human enteric viral pathogens. The cellular origins of these circular ssDNA viruses, whether human cells, ingested plants, animals or fungal foods, or residents of the gut microbiome, are currently unknown.es_PE
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded by NHLBI Grant R01 HL105770 to E.L.D and by Sao Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) Grant numbers 2014/05211-2 and 2012/03417-7 to A.C.C.es_PE
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_PE
dc.language.isoenges_PE
dc.publisherSpringer International Publishinges_PE
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26780893es_PE
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_PE
dc.sourceUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)es_PE
dc.sourceRepositorio Académico - UPCes_PE
dc.subjectDiarrheaes_PE
dc.subjectDNA viral genomeses_PE
dc.subjectCentral Americanes_PE
dc.subjectSouth Americanes_PE
dc.titleThe fecal virome of South and Central American children with diarrhea includes small circular DNA viral genomes of unknown origin.es_PE
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_PE
dc.identifier.journalArchives of virology (Arch Virol.)es_PE
dc.description.peer-reviewRevisión por pareses_PE
dc.contributor.emaildelwarte@medicine.ucsf.edues_PE

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