Influence of parental education on Honduran medical students' labour perspectives: rural work and emigration.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/604438
Title:
Influence of parental education on Honduran medical students' labour perspectives: rural work and emigration.
Authors:
Zambrano, Lysien I; Pereyra Elías, Reneé; Reyes García, Selvin Z; Fuentes, Itzel; Mayta Tristán, Percy ( 0000-0002-0861-6606 )
Citation:
Influence of parental education on Honduran medical students' labour perspectives: rural work and emigration. 2015, 20 (4):121-8 Can J Rural Med
Publisher:
The Society of Rural Physicians of Canada
Journal:
Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine (Can J Rural Med.)
Issue Date:
Oct-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/604438
PubMed ID:
26447731
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26447731
Abstract:
INTRODUCTION: We sought to evaluate the intentions of Honduran medical students to emigrate or to work in a rural setting, and their association with parental education. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional, analytic study at a Honduran medical school. Student participants completed a structured questionnaire, which assessed their intentions to emigrate or work in a rural setting after finishing medical school and the highest level of education achieved by their parents. We calculated crude and adjusted prevalence ratios with their respective 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Of 868 surveys distributed, 564 were completed. The mean age of the participants was 21 (standard deviation 3) years, and 62.2% were female. Of the respondents, 16.6% intended to emigrate to work and 11.2% intended to work in a rural setting. Higher paternal education (i.e., technical, university and postgraduate training) was associated with a higher rate of intention to emigrate. Students whose fathers underwent postgraduate education were less likely to intend to work in a rural setting. For maternal education, only the postgraduate level was associated with the outcomes in some of the tested models. CONCLUSION: The frequency of students intending to emigrate was relatively low. However, the frequency of students being willing to work in rural settings was also low. Students whose parents had higher levels of education were more likely to intend to work abroad and less likely to intend to work in a rural area. These factors should be considered in medical schools' selection processes to improve retention and ensure adequate distribution of physicians.
Type:
info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights:
info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
Language:
eng
Keywords:
Emigracion; Students Medical; Homduras
ISSN:
1488-237X
Email:
percy.mayta@upc.edu.pe

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZambrano, Lysien Ies_PE
dc.contributor.authorPereyra Elías, Reneées_PE
dc.contributor.authorReyes García, Selvin Zes_PE
dc.contributor.authorFuentes, Itzeles_PE
dc.contributor.authorMayta Tristán, Percyes_PE
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-04T21:47:43Zes_PE
dc.date.available2016-04-04T21:47:43Zes_PE
dc.date.issued2015-10es_PE
dc.identifier.citationInfluence of parental education on Honduran medical students' labour perspectives: rural work and emigration. 2015, 20 (4):121-8 Can J Rural Medes_PE
dc.identifier.issn1488-237Xes_PE
dc.identifier.pmid26447731es_PE
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/604438es_PE
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: We sought to evaluate the intentions of Honduran medical students to emigrate or to work in a rural setting, and their association with parental education. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional, analytic study at a Honduran medical school. Student participants completed a structured questionnaire, which assessed their intentions to emigrate or work in a rural setting after finishing medical school and the highest level of education achieved by their parents. We calculated crude and adjusted prevalence ratios with their respective 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Of 868 surveys distributed, 564 were completed. The mean age of the participants was 21 (standard deviation 3) years, and 62.2% were female. Of the respondents, 16.6% intended to emigrate to work and 11.2% intended to work in a rural setting. Higher paternal education (i.e., technical, university and postgraduate training) was associated with a higher rate of intention to emigrate. Students whose fathers underwent postgraduate education were less likely to intend to work in a rural setting. For maternal education, only the postgraduate level was associated with the outcomes in some of the tested models. CONCLUSION: The frequency of students intending to emigrate was relatively low. However, the frequency of students being willing to work in rural settings was also low. Students whose parents had higher levels of education were more likely to intend to work abroad and less likely to intend to work in a rural area. These factors should be considered in medical schools' selection processes to improve retention and ensure adequate distribution of physicians.es_PE
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_PE
dc.language.isoenges_PE
dc.publisherThe Society of Rural Physicians of Canadaes_PE
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26447731es_PE
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_PE
dc.sourceUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)es_PE
dc.sourceRepositorio Académico - UPCes_PE
dc.subjectEmigraciones_PE
dc.subjectStudents Medicales_PE
dc.subjectHomdurases_PE
dc.titleInfluence of parental education on Honduran medical students' labour perspectives: rural work and emigration.es_PE
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_PE
dc.identifier.journalCanadian Journal of Rural Medicine (Can J Rural Med.)es_PE
dc.description.peer-reviewRevisión por pareses_PE
dc.contributor.emailpercy.mayta@upc.edu.pees_PE
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