Detection of Bordetella pertussis using a PCR test in infants younger 3 than one year old hospitalized with whooping cough in five 4 Peruvian hospitals

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/582607
Title:
Detection of Bordetella pertussis using a PCR test in infants younger 3 than one year old hospitalized with whooping cough in five 4 Peruvian hospitals
Authors:
Castillo, María Esther; Bada, Carlos; Del Aguila, Olguita; Petrozzi Helasvuo, Verónica; Casabona Ore, Verónica; Reyes, Isabel; Del Valle Mendoza, Juana Mercedes ( 0000-0002-6011-5040 )
Citation:
Castillo ME, et al. Detection of Bordetella pertussis using a PCR test in infants younger than one year old hospitalized with whooping cough in five Peruvian hospitals. Int J Infect Dis (2015), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2015.10.020
Publisher:
International Society for Infectious Diseases (Int J Infect Dis)
Journal:
International Journal of Infectious Diseases
Issue Date:
24-Nov-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/582607
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijid.2015.10.020
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1201971215002544
Type:
info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights:
info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
Language:
eng
Description:
Objectives To report the incidence, epidemiology, and clinical features of Bordetella pertussis in Peruvian infants under 1 year old. Patients and methods A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in five hospitals in Peru from January 2010 to July 2012. A total of 392 infants under 1 year old were admitted with a clinical diagnosis of whooping cough and tested for B. pertussis by PCR. Results The pertussis toxin and IS481 genes were detected in 39.54% (155/392) of the cases. Infants aged less than 3 months were the most affected, with a prevalence of 73.55% (114/155). The most common household contact was the mother, identified in 20% (31/155) of cases. Paroxysm of coughing (89.03%, 138/155), cyanosis (68.39%, 106/155), respiratory distress (67.09%, 104/155), and breastfeeding difficulties (39.35%, 61/155) were the most frequent symptoms reported. Conclusion An increase in pertussis cases has been reported in recent years in Peru, despite national immunization efforts. Surveillance with PCR for B. pertussis is essential, especially in infants less than 1 year old, in whom a higher rate of disease-related complications and higher mortality have been reported.
Keywords:
Whooping cough; PCR; Peru; Bordetella pertussis
ISSN:
1201-9712

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCastillo, María Estheres_PE
dc.contributor.authorBada, Carloses_PE
dc.contributor.authorDel Aguila, Olguitaes_PE
dc.contributor.authorPetrozzi Helasvuo, Verónicaes_PE
dc.contributor.authorCasabona Ore, Verónicaes_PE
dc.contributor.authorReyes, Isabeles_PE
dc.contributor.authorDel Valle Mendoza, Juana Mercedeses_PE
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-24T16:27:39Zes_PE
dc.date.available2015-11-24T16:27:39Zes_PE
dc.date.issued2015-11-24es_PE
dc.identifier.citationCastillo ME, et al. Detection of Bordetella pertussis using a PCR test in infants younger than one year old hospitalized with whooping cough in five Peruvian hospitals. Int J Infect Dis (2015), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2015.10.020es_PE
dc.identifier.issn1201-9712es_PE
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijid.2015.10.020es_PE
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/582607es_PE
dc.descriptionObjectives To report the incidence, epidemiology, and clinical features of Bordetella pertussis in Peruvian infants under 1 year old. Patients and methods A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in five hospitals in Peru from January 2010 to July 2012. A total of 392 infants under 1 year old were admitted with a clinical diagnosis of whooping cough and tested for B. pertussis by PCR. Results The pertussis toxin and IS481 genes were detected in 39.54% (155/392) of the cases. Infants aged less than 3 months were the most affected, with a prevalence of 73.55% (114/155). The most common household contact was the mother, identified in 20% (31/155) of cases. Paroxysm of coughing (89.03%, 138/155), cyanosis (68.39%, 106/155), respiratory distress (67.09%, 104/155), and breastfeeding difficulties (39.35%, 61/155) were the most frequent symptoms reported. Conclusion An increase in pertussis cases has been reported in recent years in Peru, despite national immunization efforts. Surveillance with PCR for B. pertussis is essential, especially in infants less than 1 year old, in whom a higher rate of disease-related complications and higher mortality have been reported.es_PE
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_PE
dc.language.isoenges_PE
dc.publisherInternational Society for Infectious Diseases (Int J Infect Dis)es_PE
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1201971215002544es_PE
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_PE
dc.sourceUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)es_PE
dc.sourceRepositorio Académico - UPCes_PE
dc.subjectWhooping coughes_PE
dc.subjectPCRes_PE
dc.subjectPerues_PE
dc.subjectBordetella pertussises_PE
dc.titleDetection of Bordetella pertussis using a PCR test in infants younger 3 than one year old hospitalized with whooping cough in five 4 Peruvian hospitalses_PE
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_PE
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Infectious Diseaseses_PE
dc.description.fundingThis 312 work was supported by Sanofi Aventis del Peru. Conflict 313 of interest: On behalf of all authors, the corresponding author 314 states that there are no conflicts of interest or funding related 315 to this studyes_PE
All Items in UPC are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.