Delivery by caesarean section and risk of childhood obesity: analysis of a Peruvian prospective cohort

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/558501
Title:
Delivery by caesarean section and risk of childhood obesity: analysis of a Peruvian prospective cohort
Authors:
Carrillo Larco, Rodrigo M.; Miranda, J. Jaime; Bernabe Ortiz, Antonio ( 0000-0002-6834-1376 )
Citation:
Carrillo-Larco et al. (2015), Delivery by caesarean section and risk of childhood obesity: analysis of a Peruvian prospective cohort. PeerJ 3:e1046; DOI 10.7717/peerj.1046
Publisher:
PeerJ, Inc
Journal:
Peerj (PeerJ)
Issue Date:
24-Jun-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/558501
DOI:
10.7717/peerj.1046
Additional Links:
https://peerj.com/articles/1046.pdf
Abstract:
Objectives. We aimed to assess if Caesarean section is a risk factor for overnutrition in early- and late-childhood, and to assess the magnitude of the effect of child- versus family-related variables in these risk estimates. Methods. Longitudinal data from Peruvian children from the Young Lives Study was used. Outcomes assessed were overweight, obesity, overnutrition (overweight plus obesity), and central obesity (waist circumference) at the age 5 (first follow-up) and 7 (second follow-up) years. The exposure of interests was delivery by Caesarean section. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using multivariable models adjusted for child-related (e.g., birth weight) and familyrelated (e.g., maternal nutritional status) variables. Results. At baseline, mean age was 11.7 (± 3.5) months and 50.1% were boys. Children born by Caesarean section were 15.6%. The 10.5% of the children were overweight and 2.4% were obese. For the obesity outcome, data from 6,038 and 9,625 children-years was included from baseline to the first and second follow-up, respectively. Compared to those who did not experience Caesarean delivery, the risk of having obesity was higher in the group born by Caesarean: RRs were higher at early-childhood (first follow-up: 2.25; 95% CI [1.36–3.74]) than later in life (second follow-up: 1.57; 95% CI [1.02–2.41]). Family-related variables had a greater effect in attenuating the risk estimates for obesity at the first, than at the second follow-up. Conclusion. Our results suggest a higher probability of developing obesity, but not overweight, among children born by Caesarean section delivery. The magnitude of risk estimates decreased over time, and family-related variables had a stronger effect on the risk estimates at early-childhood.
Type:
info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights:
info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
Language:
eng
Keywords:
Diabetes and Endocrinology; Epidemiology; Nutrition; Pediatrics
ISSN:
2167-8359
EISSN:
2167-8359

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCarrillo Larco, Rodrigo M.es_PE
dc.contributor.authorMiranda, J. Jaimees_PE
dc.contributor.authorBernabe Ortiz, Antonioes_PE
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-24T15:20:12Zes_PE
dc.date.available2015-06-24T15:20:12Zes_PE
dc.date.issued2015-06-24es_PE
dc.identifier.citationCarrillo-Larco et al. (2015), Delivery by caesarean section and risk of childhood obesity: analysis of a Peruvian prospective cohort. PeerJ 3:e1046; DOI 10.7717/peerj.1046es_PE
dc.identifier.issn2167-8359es_PE
dc.identifier.doi10.7717/peerj.1046es_PE
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/558501es_PE
dc.description.abstractObjectives. We aimed to assess if Caesarean section is a risk factor for overnutrition in early- and late-childhood, and to assess the magnitude of the effect of child- versus family-related variables in these risk estimates. Methods. Longitudinal data from Peruvian children from the Young Lives Study was used. Outcomes assessed were overweight, obesity, overnutrition (overweight plus obesity), and central obesity (waist circumference) at the age 5 (first follow-up) and 7 (second follow-up) years. The exposure of interests was delivery by Caesarean section. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using multivariable models adjusted for child-related (e.g., birth weight) and familyrelated (e.g., maternal nutritional status) variables. Results. At baseline, mean age was 11.7 (± 3.5) months and 50.1% were boys. Children born by Caesarean section were 15.6%. The 10.5% of the children were overweight and 2.4% were obese. For the obesity outcome, data from 6,038 and 9,625 children-years was included from baseline to the first and second follow-up, respectively. Compared to those who did not experience Caesarean delivery, the risk of having obesity was higher in the group born by Caesarean: RRs were higher at early-childhood (first follow-up: 2.25; 95% CI [1.36–3.74]) than later in life (second follow-up: 1.57; 95% CI [1.02–2.41]). Family-related variables had a greater effect in attenuating the risk estimates for obesity at the first, than at the second follow-up. Conclusion. Our results suggest a higher probability of developing obesity, but not overweight, among children born by Caesarean section delivery. The magnitude of risk estimates decreased over time, and family-related variables had a stronger effect on the risk estimates at early-childhood.eng
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_PE
dc.language.isoenges_PE
dc.publisherPeerJ, Inces_PE
dc.relation.urlhttps://peerj.com/articles/1046.pdfes_PE
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_PE
dc.sourceUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)es_PE
dc.sourceRepositorio Académico - UPCes_PE
dc.subjectDiabetes and Endocrinologyes_PE
dc.subjectEpidemiologyes_PE
dc.subjectNutritiones_PE
dc.subjectPediatricses_PE
dc.titleDelivery by caesarean section and risk of childhood obesity: analysis of a Peruvian prospective cohortes_PE
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_PE
dc.identifier.eissn2167-8359es_PE
dc.identifier.journalPeerj (PeerJ)es_PE
dc.description.fundingRMC-L, JJM, AB-O, and the CRONICAS Center of Excellence in Chronic Diseases were supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Global Health Initiative under the contract Global Health Activities in Developing Countries to Combat Non-Communicable Chronic Diseases (Project Number 268200900033C-1-0-1). AB-O is currently supported by a Wellcome Trust Research Training Fellowship in Public Health and Tropical Medicine (Grant 103994/Z/14/Z). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.es_PE
dc.description.peer-reviewRevisión por pareses_PE
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