Association between depression and glycemic control among type 2 diabetes patients in Lima, Peru

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/556689
Title:
Association between depression and glycemic control among type 2 diabetes patients in Lima, Peru
Authors:
Crispín Trebejo, Brenda; Robles Cuadros, María Cristina; Bernabe Ortiz, Antonio ( 0000-0002-6834-1376 )
Publisher:
Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd
Journal:
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry
Issue Date:
10-Jun-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/556689
DOI:
26037488
PubMed ID:
26037488
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26037488
Abstract:
Introduction: There is limited and controversial information regarding the potential impact of depression on glycemic control. This study aims to evaluate the association between depression and poor glycemic control. In addition, the prevalence of depression and rates of poor glycemic control were determined. Methods: Cross-sectional study performed in the endocrinology unit of two hospitals of ESSALUD in Peru. The outcome of interest was poor glycemic control, evaluated by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c: < 7% versus ≥ 7%), whereas the exposure of interest was depression defined as 15 or more points in the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 tool. The association of interest was evaluated using Poisson regression models with robust standard errors reporting prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) adjusting for potential confounders. Results: A total of 277 participants, 184 (66.4%) males, mean age 59.0 (SD: 4.8), and 7.1 (SD: 6.8) years of disease were analyzed. Only 31 participants (11.2%; 95% CI: 7.5%–14.9%) had moderately severe or severe depression, whereas 70 (25.3%; 95% CI 20.3%–30.8%) had good glycemic control. Depression increased the probability of having poor glycemic control (PR = 1.32; 95% CI 1.15–1.51) after adjusting for several potential confounders. Conclusions: There is an association between depression and poor glycemic control among type 2 diabetes patients. Our results suggest that early detection of depression might be important to facilitate appropriate glycemic control and avoid further metabolic complications.
Type:
info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights:
info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
Language:
eng
Description:
maria.cristina.rc2690@gmail.com; Article
Keywords:
Depression; Glycated hemoglobin; Prevalence; Type 2 diabetes; Peru
ISSN:
1758-5864

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCrispín Trebejo, Brendaes_PE
dc.contributor.authorRobles Cuadros, María Cristinaes_PE
dc.contributor.authorBernabe Ortiz, Antonioes_PE
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-10T15:25:48Zes_PE
dc.date.available2015-06-10T15:25:48Zes_PE
dc.date.issued2015-06-10es_PE
dc.identifier.issn1758-5864es_PE
dc.identifier.pmid26037488es_PE
dc.identifier.doi26037488es_PE
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/556689es_PE
dc.descriptionmaria.cristina.rc2690@gmail.comes_PE
dc.descriptionArticlees_PE
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: There is limited and controversial information regarding the potential impact of depression on glycemic control. This study aims to evaluate the association between depression and poor glycemic control. In addition, the prevalence of depression and rates of poor glycemic control were determined. Methods: Cross-sectional study performed in the endocrinology unit of two hospitals of ESSALUD in Peru. The outcome of interest was poor glycemic control, evaluated by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c: < 7% versus ≥ 7%), whereas the exposure of interest was depression defined as 15 or more points in the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 tool. The association of interest was evaluated using Poisson regression models with robust standard errors reporting prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) adjusting for potential confounders. Results: A total of 277 participants, 184 (66.4%) males, mean age 59.0 (SD: 4.8), and 7.1 (SD: 6.8) years of disease were analyzed. Only 31 participants (11.2%; 95% CI: 7.5%–14.9%) had moderately severe or severe depression, whereas 70 (25.3%; 95% CI 20.3%–30.8%) had good glycemic control. Depression increased the probability of having poor glycemic control (PR = 1.32; 95% CI 1.15–1.51) after adjusting for several potential confounders. Conclusions: There is an association between depression and poor glycemic control among type 2 diabetes patients. Our results suggest that early detection of depression might be important to facilitate appropriate glycemic control and avoid further metabolic complications.eng
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_PE
dc.language.isoenges_PE
dc.publisherWiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltdes_PE
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26037488es_PE
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_PE
dc.sourceUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)es_PE
dc.sourceRepositorio Académico - UPCes_PE
dc.subjectDepressiones_PE
dc.subjectGlycated hemoglobines_PE
dc.subjectPrevalencees_PE
dc.subjectType 2 diabeteses_PE
dc.subjectPerues_PE
dc.titleAssociation between depression and glycemic control among type 2 diabetes patients in Lima, Perues_PE
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_PE
dc.identifier.journalAsia-Pacific Psychiatryes_PE
dc.description.fundingWe would like to thank Dr Viviana Ulloa who helped us to access data and T2D patients, and Dr Percy Mayta- Tristan for revising initial versions of the manuscript. AB-O is supported by Wellcome Trust Research Training Fellowship in Public Health and Tropical Medicine (Grant number 103994/Z/14/Z).es_PE
dc.description.peer-reviewRevisión por pareses_PE
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