An unidentified cluster of infection in the Peruvian Amazon region

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/555445
Title:
An unidentified cluster of infection in the Peruvian Amazon region
Authors:
Cornejo Tapia, Ángela; Gomes, Cláudia; Suárez Ognio, Luis; Martínez Puchol, Sandra; Bustamante, Pershing; Pons, Maria J.; Ruiz, Joaquim; Del Valle Mendoza, Juana
Publisher:
The Journal of Infection in Developing Countries
Journal:
The Journal of Infection in Developing Countries (J Infect Dev Ctries.)
Issue Date:
21-May-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/555445
DOI:
10.3855/jidc.6235
Additional Links:
http://www.jidc.org/index.php/journal/article/view/25989173/1306
Abstract:
Introduction: Bartonella bacilliformis is the etiological agent of Carrion’s disease, which is a neglected disease linked to people in low-socioeconomic populations in Andean valleys. An outbreak of B. bacilliformis was reported in a rural area of the Peruvian Amazon region. The aim of this study was to characterize this outbreak using molecular techniques. Methodology: Fifty-three blood samples from patients diagnosed with Carrion’s disease were analyzed by molecular tools, using both a Bartonella-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and an universal PCR, both based on 16S rRNA gene amplification. Additional water samples from the area were also analyzed. Results: Unexpectedly, the samples were positive only when the universal PCR was used. Although environmental contamination cannot be ruled out, the results showed that Sphingomonas faeni was the possible causative agent of this outbreak, and that water was the most feasible infection source. Conclusions: Diagnosis by clinical criteria or microscopy may lead to misdiagnosis. There is a need to include molecular tools in the routine diagnosis of febrile syndromes, including Carrion’s disease.
Type:
info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights:
info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
Language:
eng
Description:
joruiz@clinic.ub.es
Keywords:
Bartonella spp.; Sphingomonas; diagnosis; Outbreak; Perú
ISSN:
1972-2680

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCornejo Tapia, Ángelaes_PE
dc.contributor.authorGomes, Cláudiaes_PE
dc.contributor.authorSuárez Ognio, Luises_PE
dc.contributor.authorMartínez Puchol, Sandraes_PE
dc.contributor.authorBustamante, Pershinges_PE
dc.contributor.authorPons, Maria J.es_PE
dc.contributor.authorRuiz, Joaquimes_PE
dc.contributor.authorDel Valle Mendoza, Juanaes_PE
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-21T17:53:46Zes_PE
dc.date.available2015-05-21T17:53:46Zes_PE
dc.date.issued2015-05-21es_PE
dc.identifier.issn1972-2680es_PE
dc.identifier.doi10.3855/jidc.6235es_PE
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/555445es_PE
dc.descriptionjoruiz@clinic.ub.eses_PE
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Bartonella bacilliformis is the etiological agent of Carrion’s disease, which is a neglected disease linked to people in low-socioeconomic populations in Andean valleys. An outbreak of B. bacilliformis was reported in a rural area of the Peruvian Amazon region. The aim of this study was to characterize this outbreak using molecular techniques. Methodology: Fifty-three blood samples from patients diagnosed with Carrion’s disease were analyzed by molecular tools, using both a Bartonella-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and an universal PCR, both based on 16S rRNA gene amplification. Additional water samples from the area were also analyzed. Results: Unexpectedly, the samples were positive only when the universal PCR was used. Although environmental contamination cannot be ruled out, the results showed that Sphingomonas faeni was the possible causative agent of this outbreak, and that water was the most feasible infection source. Conclusions: Diagnosis by clinical criteria or microscopy may lead to misdiagnosis. There is a need to include molecular tools in the routine diagnosis of febrile syndromes, including Carrion’s disease.eng
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_PE
dc.language.isoenges_PE
dc.publisherThe Journal of Infection in Developing Countrieses_PE
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.jidc.org/index.php/journal/article/view/25989173/1306es_PE
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_PE
dc.sourceUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)es_PE
dc.sourceRepositorio Académico - UPCes_PE
dc.subjectBartonella spp.es_PE
dc.subjectSphingomonas; diagnosises_PE
dc.subjectOutbreakes_PE
dc.subjectPerúes_PE
dc.titleAn unidentified cluster of infection in the Peruvian Amazon regiones_PE
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_PE
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Infection in Developing Countries (J Infect Dev Ctries.)es_PE
dc.description.fundingThis study was funded by the Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII, Spain) (grant number: FI12/00561, which included FEDER funds), by the Spanish Network for the Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI RD12/0015) and Generalitat de Catalunya, Departament d’Universitats, Recerca i Societat de la Informació (2014 SGR 26) (JR) and by internal funds of the Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC), Lima-Peru (JdV). JR has a fellowship from the program I3, of the ISCIII (grant number: CES11/012). CG has a PhD fellowship of the ISCIII (FI12/00561). MJP has a postdoctoral fellowship from CONCYTEC. We thank Donna Pringle for language and idiomatic corrections.es_PE
dc.description.peer-reviewRevisión por pareses_PE
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