A community randomised controlled trial evaluating a home-based environmental intervention package of improved stoves, solar water disinfection and kitchen sinks in rural Peru: Rationale, trial design and baseline findings

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/347070
Title:
A community randomised controlled trial evaluating a home-based environmental intervention package of improved stoves, solar water disinfection and kitchen sinks in rural Peru: Rationale, trial design and baseline findings
Authors:
Hartinger, S.M.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Hattendorf, J.; Gil, I.; Verastegui, H.; Ochoa, T.; Mäusezahl, D.
Publisher:
Elsevier B.V.
Journal:
Contemporary Clinical Trials
Issue Date:
24-Mar-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/347070
DOI:
10.1016/j.cct.2011.06.006
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1551714411001510
Abstract:
Introduction: Pneumonia and diarrhoea are leading causes of death in children. There is a need to develop effective interventions. Objective: We present the design and baseline findings of a community-randomised controlled trial in rural Peru to evaluate the health impact of an Integrated Home-based Intervention Package in children aged 6 to 35 months. Methods: We randomised 51 communities. The intervention was developed through a community-participatory approach prior to the trial. They comprised the construction of improved stoves and kitchen sinks, the promotion of hand washing, and solar drinking water disinfection (SODIS). To reduce the potential impact of non-blinding bias, a psychomotor stimulation intervention was implemented in the control arm. The baseline survey included anthropometric and socio-economic characteristics. In a sub-sample we determined the level of faecal contamination of drinking water, hands and kitchen utensils and the prevalence of diarrhoegenic Escherichia coli in stool specimen. Results: We enrolled 534 children. At baseline all households used open fires and 77% had access to piped water supplies. E. coli was found in drinking water in 68% and 64% of the intervention and control households. Diarrhoegenic E. coli strains were isolated from 45/139 stool samples. The proportion of stunted children was 54%. Conclusions: Randomization resulted in comparable study arms. Recently, several critical reviews raised major concerns on the reliability of open health intervention trials, because of uncertain sustainability and non-blinding bias. In this regard, the presented trial featuring objective outcome measures, a simultaneous intervention in the control communities and a 12- month follow up period will provide valuable evidence.
Type:
info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights:
info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
Language:
eng
Description:
clanata@iin.sld.pe
Keywords:
Community randomised trial; Diarrhoea; Acute lower respiratory infections; Hygiene; Hand-washing; Child health
ISSN:
1551-7144

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHartinger, S.M.es_PE
dc.contributor.authorLanata, Claudio F.es_PE
dc.contributor.authorHattendorf, J.es_PE
dc.contributor.authorGil, I.es_PE
dc.contributor.authorVerastegui, H.es_PE
dc.contributor.authorOchoa, T.es_PE
dc.contributor.authorMäusezahl, D.es_PE
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-24T18:04:43Zes_PE
dc.date.available2015-03-24T18:04:43Zes_PE
dc.date.issued2015-03-24es_PE
dc.identifier.issn1551-7144es_PE
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cct.2011.06.006es_PE
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/347070es_PE
dc.descriptionclanata@iin.sld.pees_PE
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Pneumonia and diarrhoea are leading causes of death in children. There is a need to develop effective interventions. Objective: We present the design and baseline findings of a community-randomised controlled trial in rural Peru to evaluate the health impact of an Integrated Home-based Intervention Package in children aged 6 to 35 months. Methods: We randomised 51 communities. The intervention was developed through a community-participatory approach prior to the trial. They comprised the construction of improved stoves and kitchen sinks, the promotion of hand washing, and solar drinking water disinfection (SODIS). To reduce the potential impact of non-blinding bias, a psychomotor stimulation intervention was implemented in the control arm. The baseline survey included anthropometric and socio-economic characteristics. In a sub-sample we determined the level of faecal contamination of drinking water, hands and kitchen utensils and the prevalence of diarrhoegenic Escherichia coli in stool specimen. Results: We enrolled 534 children. At baseline all households used open fires and 77% had access to piped water supplies. E. coli was found in drinking water in 68% and 64% of the intervention and control households. Diarrhoegenic E. coli strains were isolated from 45/139 stool samples. The proportion of stunted children was 54%. Conclusions: Randomization resulted in comparable study arms. Recently, several critical reviews raised major concerns on the reliability of open health intervention trials, because of uncertain sustainability and non-blinding bias. In this regard, the presented trial featuring objective outcome measures, a simultaneous intervention in the control communities and a 12- month follow up period will provide valuable evidence.eng
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_PE
dc.language.isoenges_PE
dc.publisherElsevier B.V.es_PE
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1551714411001510es_PE
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_PE
dc.sourceUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)es_PE
dc.sourceRepositorio Académico - UPCes_PE
dc.subjectCommunity randomised triales_PE
dc.subjectDiarrhoeaes_PE
dc.subjectAcute lower respiratory infectionses_PE
dc.subjectHygienees_PE
dc.subjectHand-washinges_PE
dc.subjectChild healthes_PE
dc.titleA community randomised controlled trial evaluating a home-based environmental intervention package of improved stoves, solar water disinfection and kitchen sinks in rural Peru: Rationale, trial design and baseline findingses_PE
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_PE
dc.identifier.journalContemporary Clinical Trialses_PE
dc.description.fundingThis study received financial support of the UBS Optimus Foundation, through a grant given to the IIN and Swiss TPH. The sponsors had no role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; or preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript.eng
dc.description.peer-reviewRevisión por pareses_PE
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