Economic Inequality Is Linked to Biased Self-Perception

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/324770
Title:
Economic Inequality Is Linked to Biased Self-Perception
Authors:
Loughnan, Steve; Kuppens, Peter; Allik, Jüri; Balazs, Katalin; De Lemus, Soledad; Dumont, Kitty; Gargurevich, Rafael; Hidegkuti, Istvan; Leidner, Bernhard; Matos, Lennia; Park, Joonha; Realo, Anu; Shi, Junqi; Sojo, Victor Eduardo; Yuk-yue Tong; Vaes, Jeroen; Verduyn, Philippe; Yeung, Victoria; Haslam, Nick
Citation:
Psychol Sci. 2011 Oct;22(10):1254-8
Publisher:
Association for Psychological Science
Journal:
Psychological science
Issue Date:
13-Aug-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/324770
DOI:
10.1177/0956797611417003
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21948855
Abstract:
People’s self-perception biases often lead them to see themselves as better than the average person (a phenomenon known as self-enhancement). This bias varies across cultures, and variations are typically explained using cultural variables, such as individualism versus collectivism. We propose that socioeconomic differences among societies—specifically, relative levels of economic inequality—play an important but unrecognized role in how people evaluate themselves. Evidence for selfenhancement was found in 15 diverse nations, but the magnitude of the bias varied. Greater self-enhancement was found in societies with more income inequality, and income inequality predicted cross-cultural differences in self-enhancement better than did individualism/collectivism. These results indicate that macrosocial differences in the distribution of economic goods are linked to microsocial processes of perceiving the self.
Type:
info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights:
info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
Language:
eng
Keywords:
Self-perception; Self-enhancement; Income inequality; Culture; Self-esteem; Sociocultural Factors; Socioeconomic Status
ISSN:
0956-7976
EISSN:
1467-9280
Email:
s.loughnan@kent.ac.uk

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLoughnan, Stevees_PE
dc.contributor.authorKuppens, Peteres_PE
dc.contributor.authorAllik, Jüries_PE
dc.contributor.authorBalazs, Katalines_PE
dc.contributor.authorDe Lemus, Soledades_PE
dc.contributor.authorDumont, Kittyes_PE
dc.contributor.authorGargurevich, Rafaeles_PE
dc.contributor.authorHidegkuti, Istvanes_PE
dc.contributor.authorLeidner, Bernhardes_PE
dc.contributor.authorMatos, Lenniaes_PE
dc.contributor.authorPark, Joonhaes_PE
dc.contributor.authorRealo, Anues_PE
dc.contributor.authorShi, Junqies_PE
dc.contributor.authorSojo, Victor Eduardoes_PE
dc.contributor.authorYuk-yue Tonges_PE
dc.contributor.authorVaes, Jeroenes_PE
dc.contributor.authorVerduyn, Philippees_PE
dc.contributor.authorYeung, Victoriaes_PE
dc.contributor.authorHaslam, Nickes_PE
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-13T22:46:01Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-13T22:46:01Z-
dc.date.issued2014-08-13-
dc.identifier.citationPsychol Sci. 2011 Oct;22(10):1254-8es_PE
dc.identifier.issn0956-7976-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0956797611417003-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/324770-
dc.description.abstractPeople’s self-perception biases often lead them to see themselves as better than the average person (a phenomenon known as self-enhancement). This bias varies across cultures, and variations are typically explained using cultural variables, such as individualism versus collectivism. We propose that socioeconomic differences among societies—specifically, relative levels of economic inequality—play an important but unrecognized role in how people evaluate themselves. Evidence for selfenhancement was found in 15 diverse nations, but the magnitude of the bias varied. Greater self-enhancement was found in societies with more income inequality, and income inequality predicted cross-cultural differences in self-enhancement better than did individualism/collectivism. These results indicate that macrosocial differences in the distribution of economic goods are linked to microsocial processes of perceiving the self.eng
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_PE
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherAssociation for Psychological Sciencees_PE
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21948855es_PE
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_PE
dc.sourceUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)es_PE
dc.sourceRepositorio Académico - UPCes_PE
dc.subjectSelf-perceptiones_PE
dc.subjectSelf-enhancementes_PE
dc.subjectIncome inequalityes_PE
dc.subjectCulturees_PE
dc.subjectSelf-esteemes_PE
dc.subjectSociocultural Factorses_PE
dc.subjectSocioeconomic Statuses_PE
dc.titleEconomic Inequality Is Linked to Biased Self-Perceptiones_PE
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_PE
dc.identifier.eissn1467-9280-
dc.identifier.journalPsychological sciencees_PE
dc.description.fundingSteve Loughnan is a postdoctoral research associate funded by the Leverhulme Trust (F/00236/W). Peter Kuppens is a postdoctoral research fellow with the Fund for Scientific Research-Flanders and is supported by Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Research Council Grants GOA/05/04 and OT/11/031. Anu Realo and Jüri Allik were supported by a grant from the Estonian Ministry of Education and Science (SF0180029s08). Junqi Shi was supported by a grant from the National Nature Foundation of China (NSFC:71021001).eng
dc.description.peer-reviewRevisión por pareses_PE
dc.contributor.emails.loughnan@kent.ac.ukes_PE
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