Diagnosis of Carrion’s Disease by Direct Blood PCR in Thin Blood Smear Negative Samples.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/315714
Title:
Diagnosis of Carrion’s Disease by Direct Blood PCR in Thin Blood Smear Negative Samples.
Authors:
Del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Silva Caso, Wilmer; Tinco Valdez, Carmen; Pons, Maria J.; Del Valle, Luis J.; Casabona Oré, Verónica; Champin Michelena, Denisse; Bazán Mayra, Jorge; Zavaleta Gavidea, Víctor; Vargas, Martha; Ruiz, Joaquim
Citation:
PLoS ONE 9(3): e92283
Publisher:
Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Journal:
PLoS ONE
Issue Date:
11-Apr-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/315714
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0092283
Additional Links:
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0092283
Type:
info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights:
info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
Language:
eng
Description:
Bartonella bacilliformis is the etiologic agent of Carrion’s disease. This disease has two well established phases, the most relevant being the so called Oroya Fever, in which B. bacilliformis infect the erythrocytes resulting in severe anemia and transient immunosuppression, with a high lethality in the absence of adequate antibiotic treatment. The presence of B. bacilliformis was studied in 113 blood samples suspected of Carrion’s disease based on clinical criteria, despite the absence of a positive thin blood smear, by two different PCR techniques (using Bartonella-specific and universal 16S rRNA gene primers), and by bacterial culture. The specific 16S rRNA gene primers revealed the presence of 21 B. bacilliformis and 1 Bartonella elizabethae, while universal primers showed both the presence of 3 coinfections in which a concomitant pathogen was detected plus Bartonella, in addition to the presence of infections by other microorganisms such as Agrobacterium or Bacillus firmus. These data support the need to implement molecular tools to diagnose Carrion’s disease.
EISSN:
1932-6203
Sponsors:
This work has been partially supported by Optimus Foundation and by personal funds of JdVM. JR is supported by the program I3, of the ISCIII (grant number: CES11/012) and by ISCIII grant PI11/00983. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDel Valle Mendoza, Juanaes_PE
dc.contributor.authorSilva Caso, Wilmeres_PE
dc.contributor.authorTinco Valdez, Carmenes_PE
dc.contributor.authorPons, Maria J.es_PE
dc.contributor.authorDel Valle, Luis J.es_PE
dc.contributor.authorCasabona Oré, Verónicaes_PE
dc.contributor.authorChampin Michelena, Denissees_PE
dc.contributor.authorBazán Mayra, Jorgees_PE
dc.contributor.authorZavaleta Gavidea, Víctores_PE
dc.contributor.authorVargas, Marthaes_PE
dc.contributor.authorRuiz, Joaquimes_PE
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-12T01:53:53Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-12T01:53:53Z-
dc.date.issued2014-04-11-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS ONE 9(3): e92283es_PE
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0092283-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/315714es_PE
dc.descriptionBartonella bacilliformis is the etiologic agent of Carrion’s disease. This disease has two well established phases, the most relevant being the so called Oroya Fever, in which B. bacilliformis infect the erythrocytes resulting in severe anemia and transient immunosuppression, with a high lethality in the absence of adequate antibiotic treatment. The presence of B. bacilliformis was studied in 113 blood samples suspected of Carrion’s disease based on clinical criteria, despite the absence of a positive thin blood smear, by two different PCR techniques (using Bartonella-specific and universal 16S rRNA gene primers), and by bacterial culture. The specific 16S rRNA gene primers revealed the presence of 21 B. bacilliformis and 1 Bartonella elizabethae, while universal primers showed both the presence of 3 coinfections in which a concomitant pathogen was detected plus Bartonella, in addition to the presence of infections by other microorganisms such as Agrobacterium or Bacillus firmus. These data support the need to implement molecular tools to diagnose Carrion’s disease.es_PE
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work has been partially supported by Optimus Foundation and by personal funds of JdVM. JR is supported by the program I3, of the ISCIII (grant number: CES11/012) and by ISCIII grant PI11/00983. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.eng
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_PE
dc.language.isoenges_PE
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (PLoS)es_PE
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0092283es_PE
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_PE
dc.sourceUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)es_PE
dc.sourceRepositorio Académico - UPCes_PE
dc.titleDiagnosis of Carrion’s Disease by Direct Blood PCR in Thin Blood Smear Negative Samples.es_PE
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_PE
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.journalPLoS ONEes_PE
dc.description.peer-reviewRevisión por pares.es_PE
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