Global Causes of Diarrheal Disease Mortality in Children <5 Years of Age: A Systematic Review.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/314287
Title:
Global Causes of Diarrheal Disease Mortality in Children <5 Years of Age: A Systematic Review.
Authors:
Claudio F. Lanata; Christa L. Fischer-Walker; Ana C. Olascoaga; Carla X. Torres; Martin J. Aryee; Robert E. Black
Citation:
PLoS ONE 8(9): e72788
Publisher:
Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Issue Date:
19-Mar-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/314287
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0072788
Additional Links:
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0072788
Abstract:
Estimation of pathogen-specific causes of child diarrhea deaths is needed to guide vaccine development and other prevention strategies. We did a systematic review of articles published between 1990 and 2011 reporting at least one of 13 pathogens in children ,5 years of age hospitalized with diarrhea. We included 2011 rotavirus data from the Rotavirus Surveillance Network coordinated by WHO. We excluded studies conducted during diarrhea outbreaks that did not discriminate between inpatient and outpatient cases, reporting nosocomial infections, those conducted in special populations, not done with adequate methods, and rotavirus studies in countries where the rotavirus vaccine was used. Age-adjusted median proportions for each pathogen were calculated and applied to 712 000 deaths due to diarrhea in children under 5 years for 2011, assuming that those observed among children hospitalized for diarrhea represent those causing child diarrhea deaths. 163 articles and WHO studies done in 31 countries were selected representing 286 inpatient studies. Studies seeking only one pathogen found higher proportions for some pathogens than studies seeking multiple pathogens (e.g. 39% rotavirus in 180 single-pathogen studies vs. 20% in 24 studies with 5–13 pathogens, p,0?0001). The percentage of episodes for which no pathogen could be identified was estimated to be 34%; the total of all age-adjusted percentages for pathogens and no-pathogen cases was 138%. Adjusting all proportions, including unknowns, to add to 100%, we estimated that rotavirus caused 197 000 [Uncertainty range (UR) 110 000–295 000], enteropathogenic E. coli 79 000 (UR 31 000–146 000), calicivirus 71 000 (UR 39 000–113 000), and enterotoxigenic E. coli 42 000 (UR 20 000–76 000) deaths. Rotavirus, calicivirus, enteropathogenic and enterotoxigenic E. coli cause more than half of all diarrheal deaths in children ,5 years in the world.
Type:
info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights:
info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
Language:
eng
EISSN:
1932-6203
Sponsors:
The work was supported by a grant to the US Fund for United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for the Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group of World Health Organization and UNICEF and by Prof. Lanatas Institutional Research Funds. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorClaudio F. Lanataes_PE
dc.contributor.authorChrista L. Fischer-Walkeres_PE
dc.contributor.authorAna C. Olascoagaes_PE
dc.contributor.authorCarla X. Torreses_PE
dc.contributor.authorMartin J. Aryeees_PE
dc.contributor.authorRobert E. Blackes_PE
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-19T22:25:46Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-19T22:25:46Z-
dc.date.issued2014-03-19-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS ONE 8(9): e72788es_PE
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0072788-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/314287es_PE
dc.description.abstractEstimation of pathogen-specific causes of child diarrhea deaths is needed to guide vaccine development and other prevention strategies. We did a systematic review of articles published between 1990 and 2011 reporting at least one of 13 pathogens in children ,5 years of age hospitalized with diarrhea. We included 2011 rotavirus data from the Rotavirus Surveillance Network coordinated by WHO. We excluded studies conducted during diarrhea outbreaks that did not discriminate between inpatient and outpatient cases, reporting nosocomial infections, those conducted in special populations, not done with adequate methods, and rotavirus studies in countries where the rotavirus vaccine was used. Age-adjusted median proportions for each pathogen were calculated and applied to 712 000 deaths due to diarrhea in children under 5 years for 2011, assuming that those observed among children hospitalized for diarrhea represent those causing child diarrhea deaths. 163 articles and WHO studies done in 31 countries were selected representing 286 inpatient studies. Studies seeking only one pathogen found higher proportions for some pathogens than studies seeking multiple pathogens (e.g. 39% rotavirus in 180 single-pathogen studies vs. 20% in 24 studies with 5–13 pathogens, p,0?0001). The percentage of episodes for which no pathogen could be identified was estimated to be 34%; the total of all age-adjusted percentages for pathogens and no-pathogen cases was 138%. Adjusting all proportions, including unknowns, to add to 100%, we estimated that rotavirus caused 197 000 [Uncertainty range (UR) 110 000–295 000], enteropathogenic E. coli 79 000 (UR 31 000–146 000), calicivirus 71 000 (UR 39 000–113 000), and enterotoxigenic E. coli 42 000 (UR 20 000–76 000) deaths. Rotavirus, calicivirus, enteropathogenic and enterotoxigenic E. coli cause more than half of all diarrheal deaths in children ,5 years in the world.eng
dc.description.sponsorshipThe work was supported by a grant to the US Fund for United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for the Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group of World Health Organization and UNICEF and by Prof. Lanatas Institutional Research Funds. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.eng
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_PE
dc.language.isoenges_PE
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (PLoS)es_PE
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0072788es_PE
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_PE
dc.sourceUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)es_PE
dc.sourceRepositorio Académico - UPCes_PE
dc.titleGlobal Causes of Diarrheal Disease Mortality in Children <5 Years of Age: A Systematic Review.es_PE
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_PE
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203-
dc.description.peer-reviewRevisión por pareseng
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