Aflatoxin Contamination of Red Chili Pepper From Bolivia and Peru, Countries with High Gallbladder Cancer Incidence Rates

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/311040
Title:
Aflatoxin Contamination of Red Chili Pepper From Bolivia and Peru, Countries with High Gallbladder Cancer Incidence Rates
Authors:
Asai, Takao; Tsuchiya, Yasuo; Okano, Kiyoshi; Piscoya, Alejandro ( 0000-0002-4420-2419 ) ; Yoshito Nishi, Carlos; Ikoma, Toshikazu; Oyama, Tomizo; Ikegami, Kikuo; Yamamoto, Masaharu
Citation:
Asian Pacific J Cancer Prev, 13 (10), 5167-5170
Publisher:
Asian Pacific Organization for Cancer Prevetion
Issue Date:
8-Jan-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10757/311040
DOI:
10.7314/APJCP.2012.13.10.5167
Type:
info:eu-repo/semantics/article; info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights:
info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
Language:
eng
Description:
Chilean red chili peppers contaminated with aflatoxins were reported in a previous study. If the development of gallbladder cancer (GBC) in Chile is associated with a high level of consumption of aflatoxin-contaminated red chili peppers, such peppers from other countries having a high GBC incidence rate may also be contaminated with aflatoxins. We aimed to determine whether this might be the case for red chili peppers from Bolivia and Peru. A total of 7 samples (3 from Bolivia, 4 from Peru) and 3 controls (2 from China, 1 from Japan) were evaluated. Aflatoxins were extracted with acetonitrile:water (9:1, v/v) and eluted through an immuno-affinity column. The concentrations of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and then the detected aflatoxins were identified using HPLC-mass spectrometry. In some but not all of the samples from Bolivia and Peru, aflatoxin B1 or aflatoxins B1 and B2 were detected. In particular, aflatoxin B1 or total aflatoxin concentrations in a Bolivian samples were above the maximum levels for aflatoxins in spices proposed by the European Commission. Red chili peppers from Bolivia and Peru consumed by populations having high GBC incidence rates would appear to be contaminated with aflatoxins. These data suggest the possibility that a high level of consumption of aflatoxin-contaminated red chili peppers is related to the development of GBC, and the association between the two should be confirmed by a case-control study.
Keywords:
Gallbladder cancer; Risk factor; Consumption of food contaminated with aflatoxins; HPLC
ISSN:
1513-7368 (print)
EISSN:
1513-7368 (on line)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAsai, Takaoes_PE
dc.contributor.authorTsuchiya, Yasuoes_PE
dc.contributor.authorOkano, Kiyoshies_PE
dc.contributor.authorPiscoya, Alejandroes_PE
dc.contributor.authorYoshito Nishi, Carloses_PE
dc.contributor.authorIkoma, Toshikazues_PE
dc.contributor.authorOyama, Tomizoes_PE
dc.contributor.authorIkegami, Kikuoes_PE
dc.contributor.authorYamamoto, Masaharues_PE
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-08T01:25:13Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-08T01:25:13Z-
dc.date.issued2014-01-08-
dc.identifier.citationAsian Pacific J Cancer Prev, 13 (10), 5167-5170es_PE
dc.identifier.issn1513-7368 (print)eng
dc.identifier.doi10.7314/APJCP.2012.13.10.5167-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10757/311040es_PE
dc.descriptionChilean red chili peppers contaminated with aflatoxins were reported in a previous study. If the development of gallbladder cancer (GBC) in Chile is associated with a high level of consumption of aflatoxin-contaminated red chili peppers, such peppers from other countries having a high GBC incidence rate may also be contaminated with aflatoxins. We aimed to determine whether this might be the case for red chili peppers from Bolivia and Peru. A total of 7 samples (3 from Bolivia, 4 from Peru) and 3 controls (2 from China, 1 from Japan) were evaluated. Aflatoxins were extracted with acetonitrile:water (9:1, v/v) and eluted through an immuno-affinity column. The concentrations of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and then the detected aflatoxins were identified using HPLC-mass spectrometry. In some but not all of the samples from Bolivia and Peru, aflatoxin B1 or aflatoxins B1 and B2 were detected. In particular, aflatoxin B1 or total aflatoxin concentrations in a Bolivian samples were above the maximum levels for aflatoxins in spices proposed by the European Commission. Red chili peppers from Bolivia and Peru consumed by populations having high GBC incidence rates would appear to be contaminated with aflatoxins. These data suggest the possibility that a high level of consumption of aflatoxin-contaminated red chili peppers is related to the development of GBC, and the association between the two should be confirmed by a case-control study.es_PE
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_PE
dc.language.isoenges_PE
dc.publisherAsian Pacific Organization for Cancer Prevetioneng
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_PE
dc.sourceUniversidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)es_PE
dc.sourceRepositorio Académico - UPCes_PE
dc.subjectGallbladder canceres_PE
dc.subjectRisk factores_PE
dc.subjectConsumption of food contaminated with aflatoxinses_PE
dc.subjectHPLCes_PE
dc.titleAflatoxin Contamination of Red Chili Pepper From Bolivia and Peru, Countries with High Gallbladder Cancer Incidence Rateses_PE
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleeng
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_PE
dc.identifier.eissn1513-7368 (on line)eng
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-4420-2419eng
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